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What are the essential vim commands? What does a new-user need to know to keep themselves from getting into trouble? One command per comment, please.

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Please re-word this to ask people to only post one command per answer so they can be voted on correctly. –  SCdF Sep 16 '08 at 6:47

36 Answers 36

Nobody mentioned exuberant ctags? Google and install it; much better than the default ctags you probably have. To use it, cd to your project root and type

:!ctags -R .

Builds a database of everything in your project...java, c++, python, ruby, javascript, anything, in a file called tags.

:help ctags for a host of commands, too many to summarize, for using the generated tags. Put the cursor on a function name, type CMD ], to open the file that defines it. Many more commands like that. Soon becomes second nature...almost as nice as an IDE (and VIM never lets you down they way eclipse often does.

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I made my first steps using The tutorial here, and have used the reference cheatsheet for a few weeks. And, of course, there's vimtutor in vim/gvim/Macvim.

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Sometimes it's nice to reformat a buffer (i.e. re-tab, align braces, etc). I recently learned a time saver for this:

gg=G

For example... it would turn the following:

if ( !flag )
{
  // Do something special
  }
else
   {
 // Do another special thing
}

into the following:

if ( !flag ) 
{
    // Do something special 
}
else
{
    // Do another special thing
}

Or if you had an xml file that you're hoping to re-indent because the format is all screwy you could run the above command and turn something like the following:

<root>
<addressBook>
    <contact first="Frank" last="Tank"/>
        <contact first="Foo" last="Man"/>
    </addressBook>
</root>

into something a bit more human readable like the following:

<root>
    <addressBook>
        <contact first="Frank" last="Tank"/>
        <contact first="Foo" last="Man"/>
    </addressBook>
</root>
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I switched from Textmate to VIM a few months ago and wrote a guide on how to do 110 Textmate editing commands within VIM. It's organised into categories, such as managing files, auto-completing words and syntax highlighting.

Textmate to VIM

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Please see this site for a fun way to learn the essential movement commands: http://kikuchiyo.org . I think most essential commands are covered in the thread, but I always like suggesting this for new-comers to vim. click the train first link, which has a legend for basic movement commands and the insert command i for picking up rubies. Good practice for moving around quickly.

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:g/<pattern>/t$

will copy <pattern> to the end of the file. Useful when you want to extract lines but don't want to do it one by one.

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