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I have a little function that makes URL arguments out of an object:

function MkArgs(o) {
    var ret = '?';
    for (var i in o) {
        ret += i + '=' + escape(o[i]) + '&';
    }
    return ret.substr(0, ret.length - 1);
}

which I then can call like this:

MkArgs({
    protocol: 'wsfederation',
    realm: 'https://www.x.com/',
    fedRes: 'Home/FederationResult',
    context: '~/Home/FAQ',
    version: '1.0',
    callback: '?'
});

to produce the following:

?protocol=wsfederation&realm=https%3A//www.x.com/&fedRes=Home/FederationResult&context=%7E/Home/FAQ&version=1.0&callback=%3F

everything is fine except that I don't want the last argument escaped i.e. I want:

callback=?

instead of

callback=%3F

is there any way I can indicate that within the string? I tried '\?' but that doesn't do it and haven't found any references as to how to protect a piece of string from escaping...

  • e
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5 Answers 5

The MkArgs function is your own; change it to include an escape mechanism. I would advise against using backslash, though. If this is just your own code, perhaps it would be enough to put in a hackish special case.

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I guess so... I'll post the choice I ended up making –  ekkis Aug 8 '11 at 22:09

That's a pretty special case. Maybe you should change your function:

function MkArgs(o, isJSONP) {
    var ret = '?';
    for (var i in o) {
        var val = o[i];
        val = escape(val);
        ret += i + '=' + val + '&';
    }
    return ret.substr(0, ret.length - 1) + isJSONP ? '&callback=?':'';
}

and call it:

MkArgs({
  protocol: 'wsfederation',
  realm: 'https://www.x.com/',
  fedRes: 'Home/FederationResult',
  context: '~/Home/FAQ',
  version: '1.0'
}, true);
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well, it's a special case until I have another such situation so I was hoping for a generic approach... something within the value would have been ideal –  ekkis Aug 8 '11 at 22:07

The escape or encodeURIComponent functions don't have any way of "skipping" certain characters. So, all you can do is to either avoid calling the encode function when you don't want to or replace the chars you don't want encoded, call encode and then put the original chars back again.

If you want to skip escaping the whole value for a particular key, you can just check for the particular keys that you don't want to escape and handle appropriately like this:

function MkArgs(o) {
    var ret = '?';
    for (var i in o) {
        var val = o[i];
        if (i != "callback") {
            val = encodeURIComponent(val);
        }
        ret += i + '=' + val + '&';
    }
    return ret.substr(0, ret.length - 1);
}

If you want to skip just certain characters, then you can replace them with some unique sequence, escape and then put them back:

function MkArgs(o) {
    var ret = '?';
    for (var i in o) {
        var val = o[i];
        if (i == "callback") {
            val = val.replace(/\?/, "--xx--");  // replace with unique sequence
            val = encodeURIComponent(val);
            val = val.replace(/--xx--/, "?");   // put orig characters back
        } else {
            val = encodeURIComponent(val);
        }
        ret += i + '=' + val + '&';
    }
    return ret.substr(0, ret.length - 1);
}

FYI, note I've switched to using encodeURIComponent() which is recommended over the deprecated escape() because escape() doesn't work for non-ascii characters.

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thanks for the note on non-ascii characters –  ekkis Aug 8 '11 at 22:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

thanks everyone for the replies. what I ended up doing was:

function MkArgs(o) {
    var ret = '?';
    for (var i in o) {
        ret += i;
        if (o[i]) ret += '=' + escape(o[i]);
        ret += '&';
    }
    return ret.substr(0, ret.length - 1);
}

then calling it like:

MkArgs({
    protocol: 'wsfederation',
    realm: 'https://www.x.com/',
    fedRes: 'Home/FederationResult',
    context: '~/Home/FAQ',
    version: '1.0',
    'callback=?': null
});

that way I don't rely on the values but the keys to make the distinction. not really pretty but it's the best I could think of

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function MkArgs(o) {
    var ret = '?';
    var lastEl = '';
    for (var i in o) {
        ret += i + '=' + escape(o[i]) + '&';
        lastEl = o[i];
    }
    return ret.substr(0, ret.length - 1 - lastEl.length) + lastEl;
}

this works for the last element in the object.

EDIT: It seems that in a classic for in loop, javascript does not have a precise order in which it loops over the object props, so the above solution is not guaranteed to work.
In this case you have 2 solutions :

  • If you know which property you want to "protect" from escaping, you should check for that prop in the loop and specifically not escape it :

    for (var i in o) {
         if(i=="myProp")
         // unescape
         else
         // escape
    }
    
  • If you do not now the property, but you want only the last one added into the query, you can do something like this (after building the query) :

    var q = MkArgs(o);
    var parts = q.split('=');
    var toUnescape = parts[parts.length-1];
    q = q.substring(0,q.length - toUnescape.length) + unescape(toUnescape);
    
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object keys are not guaranteed to be in any particular order when you iterate over them on an object so the "last" key can/will vary by JS implementation. There is no way to identify the last key that was declared once it's in the object. –  jfriend00 Aug 8 '11 at 19:44
    
thanks, didn't know that. but, based on his example, it probably should work for him –  gion_13 Aug 8 '11 at 20:55
    
I don't think it would work reliably across browsers. Your function does something special on the last item in the for loop, but that last item can be any of the object keys. It is not guaranteed to be the callback item. –  jfriend00 Aug 8 '11 at 20:58
    
I understand, and thanks once again for teaching me another js thing:). But... you don't know exactly what he wants: he asked for the last argument... maybe it only needs the last argument of the query string, no matter what that might me, not specifically the "callback" one –  gion_13 Aug 8 '11 at 21:02
    
But, the last argument in the for loop in MkArgs is a random key on the object o. It is not connected to the last argument in the object declaration that was passed in. Javascript does not present keys in any particular order when using for (var i in o). Therefore, there could be no programming use in this case for doing something special on the last item in the for loop because that would be a random item which wouldn't do anything predictable. –  jfriend00 Aug 8 '11 at 21:06

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