Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on teaching myself basic programming.
One simple project is to find the index of recurrences of a substring within a string. So for example, in string "abcdefdef" and substring "def", I would like the output to be 3 and 6. I have some code written, but I'm not getting the answers I want. Following is what I have written


Note:I'm aware that there may be easier way to produce the result, leveraging built-in features/packages of the language, such as Regular Expressions. I'm also aware that my approach is probably not an optimal algorithm. Never the less, at this time, I'm only seeking advice on fixing the following logic, rather than using more idiomatic approaches.

import string

def MIT(String, substring): # "String" is the main string I'm searching within
    String_list = list(String)
    substring_list = list(substring)
    i = 0
    j = 0
    counter = 0
    results = []
    while i < (len(String)-1):
        if [j] == [i]:
            j = j + 1
            i = i + 1
            counter  = counter + 1
            if counter == len(substring):
                results.append([i - len(substring)+1])
                counter = 0
                j = 0
                i = i+1
        else:
            counter = 0
            j = 0
            i = i+1
    print results
    return

My line of reasoning is as such. I turn the String and substring into a list. That allows for indexing of each letter in the string. I set i and j = 0--these will be my first values in the String and substring index, respectively. I also have a new variable, counter, which I set = to 0. Basically, I'm using counter to count how many times the letter in position [i] is equal to the element in position [j]. If counter equals the length of substring, then I know that [i - len(substring) + 1] is a position where my substring starts, so I add it to a list called results. Then I reset counter and j and continue searching for more substrings.

I know the code is awkward, but I thought that I should still be able to get the answer. Instead I get:

>>> MIT("abcdefghi", "def")
[[3]]
>>> MIT("abcdefghi", "efg")
[[3]]
>>> MIT("abcdefghi", "b")
[[1]]
>>> MIT("abcdefghi", "k")
[[1]]

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
This looks like a good question for codereview.stackexchange.com –  Gerrat Aug 8 '11 at 19:56
add comment

4 Answers 4

The main/major problem are the following:

  • for comparison, use: if String[i] == substring[j]
  • you increment i twice when you found a match, remove the second increment.
  • the loop should go till while i < len(String):

and of course it won't find overlapping matches (eg: MIT("aaa", "aa"))

There are some minor "problems", it's not really pythonic, there is no need for building lists, increment is clearer if written i += 1, a useful function should return the values not print them, etc...

If you want proper and fast code, check the classic algorithm book: http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Algorithms-Thomas-H-Cormen/dp/0262033844 . It has a whole chapter about string search.

If you want a pythonic solution without implementing the whole thing check the other answers.

share|improve this answer
    
You can look up KMP for a classic, nontrivial, string search algorithm. –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 8 '11 at 20:16
    
yes, it's in the book. But wikipedia also has some nice but very complex solutions that are not covered in the book (eg: matching multiple strings efficiently) –  Karoly Horvath Aug 8 '11 at 20:19
add comment

First, I added some comments to your code to give some tips

import string

def MIT(String, substring): 
    String_list = list(String)  # this doesn't need to be done; you can index strings
    substring_list = list(substring)
    i = 0
    j = 0
    counter = 0
    results = []
    while i < (len(String)-1):   
        if [j] == [i]:   # here you're comparing two, one-item lists. you must do substring[j] and substring[i]
            j = j + 1
            i = i + 1
            counter  = counter + 1
            if counter == len(substring):
                results.append([i - len(substring)+1]) # remove the brackets; append doesn't require them
                counter = 0
                j = 0
                i = i+1 # remove this 
        else:
            counter = 0
            j = 0
            i = i+1
print results
return

Here's how I would do it without using built-in libraries and such:

def MIT(fullstring, substring):
    results = []
    sub_len = len(substring)
    for i in range(len(fullstring)):  # range returns a list of values from 0 to (len(fullstring) - 1)
        if fullstring[i:i+sub_len] == substring: # this is slice notation; it means take characters i up to (but not including) i + the length of th substring
            results.append(i)
    return results
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! This solves the Coding Exercise: Substring Counting in cscircles.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/8-remix –  Nikos Alexandris Jun 5 '13 at 15:21
add comment

The regular expressions module (re) is much more suited for this task.

Good reference: http://docs.python.org/howto/regex.html

Also: http://docs.python.org/library/re.html

EDIT: A more 'manual' way may be to use slicing

s = len(String)
l = len(substring)
for i in range(s-l+1):
    if String[i:i+l] == substring:
        pass #add to results or whatever
share|improve this answer
    
or string.index, but I think the point is the exercise - not the answer. –  Gerrat Aug 8 '11 at 19:58
1  
Thanks, but what if I want to do it iteratively? I'm sure your method works, but I want to learn how to do it the "hard" way –  mv2323 Aug 8 '11 at 19:59
add comment

I'm not clear on whether you want to learn some good string searching algorithms, or a straightforward way to do it in Python. If it's the latter, then string.find is your friend. Something like

def find_all_indexes(needle, haystack):
    """Find the index for the beginning of each occurrence of ``needle`` in ``haystack``. Overlaps are allowed."""
    indexes = []
    last_index = haystack.find(needle)
    while -1 != last_index:
        indexes.append(last_index)
        last_index = haystack.find(needle, last_index + 1)
    return indexes


if __name__ == '__main__':
    print find_all_indexes('is', 'This is my string.')

While this is a pretty naive approach, it should be easily understandable.

If you're looking for something that uses even less of the standard library (and will actually teach you a fairly common algorithm used when implementing libraries), you could try implementing the Boyer-Moore string search algorithm.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.