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I found that running

Math.Log10(double.Epsilon) 

will return about -324 on machine A, but will return -Infinity on machine B.

They originally behaved the same way by returning -324.

Both machines started out using the same OS (WinXP SP3) and .NET version (3.5 SP1). There may have been Windows updates on machine B, but otherwise no changes are known to have happened.

What could explain the difference in behavior?

More details from discussions in comments:

  • Machine A CPU is a 32-bit Intel Core Duo T2500 2 GHz
  • Machine B CPU is a 32-bit Intel P4 2.4 GHz
  • Results collected from code running in a large application using several 3rd party components. However, same .exe and component versions are running on both machines.
  • Printing Math.Log10(double.Epsilon) in a simple console application on machine B prints -324, NOT -Infinity
  • The FPU control word on both machines is always 0x9001F (read with _controlfp()).

UPDATE: The last point (FPU control word) is no longer true: Using a newer version of _controlfp() revealed different control words, which explains the inconsistent behavior. (See rsbarro's answer below for details.)

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1  
Is this with a simple console app which does nothing but print Math.Log10(double.Epsilon)? –  Jon Skeet Aug 8 '11 at 22:02
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@Ben: Or maybe they overwrote the CLR with a JVM... –  Henk Holterman Aug 8 '11 at 22:13
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@Ben it's a constant, you can't do that. You'd have to modify the dll or somehow inject different functionality into the CLR. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Aug 8 '11 at 22:19
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@Ben: .NET constants are constant. They're burned into the code. Math.Log10(double.Epsilon) will get compiled as if it was something like Math.Log10(4.94065645841247E-324), so there's no way you can change double.Epsilon and affect this code. It's readonly members that can be changed like string.Empty. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 8 '11 at 22:24
3  
One way to find out whether Double.Epsilon is really different is to run the following code: Console.Write("{0:X16}",BitConverter.DoubleToInt64Bits(Double.Epsilon)); on each machine. More worthwhile would be to check whether each machine exhibits different floating point behavior in other cases, as it may be likely that floating-point results can vary even in the same machine, see stackoverflow.com/questions/6683059/… . –  Peter O. Aug 8 '11 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Based on the comments by @CodeInChaos and @Alexandre C, I was able to throw together some code to reproduce the issue on my PC (Win7 x64, .NET 4.0). It appears this issue is due to the denormal control that can be set using _controlfp_s. The value of double.Epsilon is the same in both cases, but the way it is evaluated changes when the denormal control is switched from SAVE to FLUSH.

Here is the sample code:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace fpuconsole
{
    class Program
    {
        [DllImport("msvcrt.dll", EntryPoint = "_controlfp_s",
            CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
        public static extern int ControlFPS(IntPtr currentControl, 
            uint newControl, uint mask);

        public const int MCW_DN= 0x03000000;
        public const int _DN_SAVE = 0x00000000;
        public const int _DN_FLUSH = 0x01000000;

        static void PrintLog10()
        {
            //Display original values
            Console.WriteLine("_controlfp_s Denormal Control untouched");
            Console.WriteLine("\tCurrent _controlfp_s control word: 0x{0:X8}", 
                GetCurrentControlWord());
            Console.WriteLine("\tdouble.Epsilon = {0}", double.Epsilon);
            Console.WriteLine("\tMath.Log10(double.Epsilon) = {0}",
                Math.Log10(double.Epsilon));
            Console.WriteLine("");

            //Set Denormal to Save, calculate Math.Log10(double.Epsilon)
            var controlWord = new UIntPtr();
            var err = ControlFPS(controlWord, _DN_SAVE, MCW_DN);
            if (err != 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error setting _controlfp_s: {0}", err);
                return;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("_controlfp_s Denormal Control set to SAVE");
            Console.WriteLine("\tCurrent _controlfp_s control word: 0x{0:X8}", 
                GetCurrentControlWord());
            Console.WriteLine("\tdouble.Epsilon = {0}", double.Epsilon);
            Console.WriteLine("\tMath.Log10(double.Epsilon) = {0}", 
                Math.Log10(double.Epsilon));
            Console.WriteLine("");

            //Set Denormal to Flush, calculate Math.Log10(double.Epsilon)
            err = ControlFPS(controlWord, _DN_FLUSH, MCW_DN);
            if (err != 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error setting _controlfp_s: {0}", err);
                return;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("_controlfp_s Denormal Control set to FLUSH");
            Console.WriteLine("\tCurrent _controlfp_s control word: 0x{0:X8}", 
                GetCurrentControlWord());
            Console.WriteLine("\tdouble.Epsilon = {0}", double.Epsilon);
            Console.WriteLine("\tMath.Log10(double.Epsilon) = {0}", 
                Math.Log10(double.Epsilon));
            Console.WriteLine("");
        }

        static int GetCurrentControlWord()
        {
            unsafe
            {
                var controlWord = 0;
                var controlWordPtr = &controlWord;
                ControlFPS((IntPtr)controlWordPtr, 0, 0);
                return controlWord;
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PrintLog10();
        }
    }
}

A couple things to note. First, I had to specify CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl on the ControlFPS declaration to avoid getting an unbalanced stack exception while debugging. Second, I had to resort to unsafe code to retrieve the value of the control word in GetCurrentControlWord(). If anyone knows of a better way to write that method, please let me know.

Here is the output:

_controlfp_s Denormal Control untouched
        Current _controlfp_s control word: 0x0009001F
        double.Epsilon = 4.94065645841247E-324
        Math.Log10(double.Epsilon) = -323.306215343116

_controlfp_s Denormal Control set to SAVE
        Current _controlfp_s control word: 0x0009001F
        double.Epsilon = 4.94065645841247E-324
        Math.Log10(double.Epsilon) = -323.306215343116

_controlfp_s Denormal Control set to FLUSH
        Current _controlfp_s control word: 0x0109001F
        double.Epsilon = 4.94065645841247E-324
        Math.Log10(double.Epsilon) = -Infinity

To determine what is going on with machine A and machine B, you could take the sample app above and run it on each machine. I think you're going to find that either:

  1. Machine A and Machine B are using different settings for _controlfp_s right from the start. The sample app will show different control word values in the first block of outputs on Machine A than it does on Machine B. After the app forces the Denormal control to SAVE, then the output should match. If this is the case then maybe you can just force the denormal control to SAVE on Machine B when your application starts up.
  2. Machine A and Machine B are using the same settings for _controlfp_s, and the output of the sample app is exactly the same on both machines. If that is the case, then there must be some code in your application (possibly DirectX, WPF?) that is flipping the _controlfp_s settings on Machine B but not on Machine A.

If you get a chance to try out the sample app on each machine, please update the comments with the results. I'm interested to see what happens.

share|improve this answer
    
@Johannes See the update to my answer (especially at the bottom). I don't think that .NET guarantees the FPU control word will be initialized the same way in different environments. You might have to test and modify it accordingly. –  rsbarro Aug 10 '11 at 5:39
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Damn, that sucks. So to sum up here, you're seeing that on 32bit CPUs, Log10 never returns -Infinity when using the test app. Your larger application returns -Infinity in all cases on Machine B. I'll see what I can dig up. Can you tell me if your larger application uses any 3rd party components? –  rsbarro Aug 12 '11 at 18:12
1  
OK, so I looked into this a bit more, and it turns out there are actually two types of floating point operations, x86 and SSE2. It's possible that the flags on Machine B are set for SSE2 and not for x86, but I'm having a hard time trying to reproduce the issue. I think the problem could be introduced however by a call to __control87_2. This function is defined either in msvcr80.dll (or msvcr90.dll or msvcr100.dll). On my Win7 dev machine I have it in msvcr100.dll, but on a test W2K3 server machine I don't see it at all. –  rsbarro Aug 16 '11 at 13:58
1  
Your last comments led me to find out that _controlfp() behaves differently, depending on which msvcr*.dll is used. Unlike before, I can now reproduce the issue on any 32-bit CPU simply by using "msvcr100_clr0400.dll" instead of "msvcrt.dll". I currently can't run tests on machine B anymore, but I think it's fair to assume that the FPU control word is the root cause for explaining the inconsistent behavior; that fact was just somewhat covered up by the inconsistent implementation of _controlfp(). Thanks for your help! –  Johannes Petzold Aug 16 '11 at 23:25
1  
@rsbarro Thanks for Your post! Unsafe code should be possible to be avoided when You add additional declaration [DllImport("msvcrt.dll", EntryPoint = "_controlfp_s", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)] public static extern int ControlFPS(ref int currentControl, int newControl, int mask); and then call it like this: ControlFPS(ref controlWord, 0, 0); It should do same thing as the unsafe code, just behind the scenes. –  Roland Pihlakas Jan 5 '14 at 4:17

It's possible that a dll was loaded into the process that messed with the x87 floating-point flags. DirectX/OpenGL related libraries are notorious for this.

There could also be differences in the jitted code(There is no requirement for floating points to behave a specific way in .net), but that's very unlikely since you use the same .net and OS version.

In .net constants get baked into the calling code, so there should be no differences between the double.Epsilons.

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3  
I'm thinking exactly about denormalization flag. The Double.Epsilon (very poorly named btw, since epsilon for floating point already has a very different traditional meaning) is defined as "smallest positive Double value that is greater than zero". This means it is probably denormalized on your machine, and something set the denormalized flag so that those numbers are truncated to zero as they are fed to Log10. Good catch. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 9:36
    
Some guys seems to have a similar issue with .NET objects created in delphi: wiert.wordpress.com/2009/05/06/… they have to surround their computation code with 8087 control code too. –  Simon Mourier Aug 10 '11 at 6:05
    
Yes, delphi does mess with the floating point flags too. At least delphi applications do, I don't remember if delphi libraries do. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '11 at 8:16

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