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Is the script below in correct form of JavaScript?

function foo(){
    return function(x){
        alert(x)
    }
}
foo()("bar");
    ↑   ↑
   There are 2 parenthesis.

It works but I don't know if it is in a correct form.
If yes, then is that mean this is also correct?

function foo(){
    return function(){
        return function(){
            return function(){
                return function(x){
                    alert(x)
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
foo()()()()("?!?!?!");

It looks strange to me but it does work...

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2  
If it works as expected, then I can't see any problem other than it looks ugly –  Phil Aug 8 '11 at 23:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The order of function calls is shown by adding parameters:-

function foo(a){
    var A=a;
    return function(a){
        A+=a;
        return function(a){
            A+=a; 
            return function(a){
                A+=a;
                return function(a){
                    A+=a;
                    alert(A)
                }
            }
        }
    }
};
foo('a')('b')('c')('d')('e');// displays abcde

You could make the function return itself so it can be repeatedly called, eg

var foo = (function(){
    var v=1;
    return function f(x){
        return x==undefined?v: (v*=x, f);
    }
})();
foo.toString=function(){
return foo();
};
alert(foo(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8)(9)(10));

Nesting is usually to keep variables private, eg

var factorial=(function(n){
    var precog = [1,1];
    var factorial= function f(y){
        if(precog[y]==undefined){
            precog[y]=y*f(y-1);
        }
        return precog[y];
    };
    factorial(n);// initialise some precogs
    return factorial;
})(100); 

Because precog is declared in the brackets its values, calculated internally by the factorial function, cannot be messed about with.

The function assigned to the variable is called as normal:-

factorial(3);
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ps The function name f above is optional, ie the var factorial can be called because the assignment occurs before the function is evaluated. –  QuentinUK Aug 9 '11 at 16:16

Yes, this is valid syntax. There's nothing stylistically wrong with it, other than that new coders might find it a bit confusing. The repeated () indicate that the previous expression is being called as a function. Your first example may be a bit more clear if written like this:

( foo() )("bar");

Your last example is effectively:

( ( ( ( foo() )() )() )() )("?!?!?!");
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2  
Agree it's valid syntax but disagree that there's nothing "stylistically wrong". It is bad style because it's difficult to read and not easily understood, so maintenance and bug fixing will be more difficult than it should be for no practical advantage. –  RobG Aug 8 '11 at 23:24
1  
@RobG: Similar constructs like (function () { ... })(); are used all the time to create private scopes in included scripts. It's not only not stylistically wrong, it's encouraged in some situations. –  cdhowie Aug 8 '11 at 23:26
1  
Using an immediately invoked function epxression is a little different to chaining calls. Even for IIFEs, the outer brackets aren't necessary but are included as "good style" because they let you know from the start what you are reading. i.e. (function(){...}()) is clearer than function(){...}(), particluarly where the function has many lines of code. –  RobG Aug 8 '11 at 23:38

This would be the right way to call those constructs. The better question is why... You can do what you've posted, but I'd find it very hard to justify nesting functions 5 times.

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1  
Presumably this is just a simplified example, or the user is trying to learn. I've had real-world cases where functions-returning-functions for two levels (foo()()()) is actually useful. –  cdhowie Aug 8 '11 at 23:23

Functions in Javascript are "first order" objects, which means they can be created and passed around like any other object. So yes, you can return them from another function, and do exactly what you mention:

var f = g();
f();

// The same as
g()();
share|improve this answer
    
It gives me an error... –  Derek 朕會功夫 Aug 8 '11 at 23:27
    
@Derek - you need to define g first, e.g. function g(){return function(){}}. –  RobG Aug 8 '11 at 23:41

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