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I'm writing a browser for the iPhone.

I'm using

NSString* storyHTML = @"";
ASIHTTPRequest *request = [ASIHTTPRequest requestWithURL:url];
[request startSynchronous];

to download HTML. The problem is sometimes there is no encoding in the HTTP header, in which case the above code defaults to Latin-ISO.

In this case I can read up to the header in the HTML and find the meta tag that specifies the actual encoding. Which looks something like this:

<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="application/xhtml+xml; charset=UTF-8" />

The problem is there are a TON of possible encodings that can be found in the meta tag as seen here: http://www.iana.org/assignments/character-sets

I would need to some how convert one of those encoding strings into one of the constant encodings found in the NSString class:

 enum {
   NSASCIIStringEncoding = 1,
   NSNEXTSTEPStringEncoding = 2,
   NSJapaneseEUCStringEncoding = 3,
   NSUTF8StringEncoding = 4,
   NSISOLatin1StringEncoding = 5, ...

There must be a class that some how determines the encoding of HTML for you. Is there a way to look into UIWebView and see how they do it?

It seems like downloading HTML should be easy, what am I missing?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Why are you concerned with the encoding? From what I've used, ASIHTTPRequest is pretty handy, and if you just use the request's responseString (as HTML) there shouldn't be any issues. You could just pass this string right into a UIWebView, etc. – RSully Aug 9 '11 at 0:09
    
ASIHTTPRequest does not work for every website. For example this site: starcitygames.com/magic/misc/… does not have an encoding in the HTTP header, however it does have an encoding in the HTML header. The result is that a few characters are screwed up. However, UIWebView, if sent directly to the URL, handles it properly. I wish I knew how they did that... – itgiawa Aug 9 '11 at 0:54
    
As per ASIHTTPRequest's site: > "ASIHTTPRequest will attempt to read the text encoding of the received data from the Content-Type header. If it finds a text encoding, it will set responseEncoding to the appropriate NSStringEncoding. If it does not find a text encoding in the header, it will use the value of defaultResponseEncoding (this defaults to NSISOLatin1StringEncoding). > When you call [request responseString], ASIHTTPRequest will attempt to create a string from the data it received, using responseEncoding as the source encoding." – RSully Aug 9 '11 at 1:25
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/3816633/… – RSully Aug 9 '11 at 1:27
    
That still does not seem to resolve the problem. The quote mentions that they are looking for the Content-Type in the HTTP header NOT the HTML header. Some sites include a content-type in the HTML header BUT NOT the HTTP header. In this case ASIHTTPRequest expects some other code to examine the HTML header. The suggestion in the other post is to default to UTF-8... not a bad idea, since it seems that most sites are probably UTF-8 rather than NSISOLatin1, but not a perfect solution... Also, I appreciate the feedback. Thank you. – itgiawa Aug 9 '11 at 1:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just going to round-up my comments and add a few final words of advice into an answer.


Comment 1:

From general usage, you can use the ASIHTTPRequest -responseString, otherwise you can use the data itself and use your own logic to figure out what type of encoding (UTF8, UTF16, etc)


Comment 2:

From the ASIHTTP website:

ASIHTTPRequest will attempt to read the text encoding of the received data from the Content-Type header. If it finds a text encoding, it will set responseEncoding to the appropriate NSStringEncoding. If it does not find a text encoding in the header, it will use the value of defaultResponseEncoding (this defaults to NSISOLatin1StringEncoding). > When you call [request responseString], ASIHTTPRequest will attempt to create a string from the data it received, using responseEncoding as the source encoding.


Comment 3

See also: Encoding problem with ASIHttpRequest


I would personally recommend taking the response data and just assuming the content can fit into UTF16 (or 8). Of course you could also use a regular-expression or HTML parser to grab the <meta> tag inside the <head> element, but if the response is in a weird content-type then you might not be able to find the string @"<head"

I would also use curl from the CLI on your computer to see what content-types ASIHTTPRequest is fetching. If you run a command like

curl -I "http://www.google.com/"

You'll get the following response:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK

Date: Tue, 09 Aug 2011 20:05:00 GMT

Expires: -1

Cache-Control: private, max-age=0

Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1

It would appear almost all sites respond correctly with this header, and when they don't I think using UTF8 would be a great bet. Could you comment with the link of the site that was giving you the issue?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I think defaulting to UTF-8 should be fine. This is a site that seems to not have an encoding in the HTTP header but does in the HTML header: starcitygames.com/magic/standard/… – itgiawa Sep 10 '11 at 23:01

Is there a way to look into UIWebView and see how they do it?

There is. UIWebView is a wrapper around WebKit, which is an open source project. You can check out the source code or browse it online.

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