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I've been fighting with android performance all night and possibly solved the issue I've been dealing with, however I'm still very confused and could use some help. Consider the timing differences between these two samples.

The first sample loads in a drawable bitmap and creates a mutable copy of it

Bitmap cacheBitmap;
Canvas cacheCanvas;
protected void onSizeChanged(int w, int h, int oldw, int oldh) {
    if (cacheBitmap != null) {
        cacheBitmap.recycle();
    }
    Resources res = getContext().getResources();
    Bitmap blankImage = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(res, R.drawable.blank);

    /* copy existing bitmap */
    cacheBitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(blankImage, w, h, false);
    /* copy existing bitmap */

    cacheCanvas = new Canvas();
    cacheCanvas.setBitmap(cacheBitmap);
    cacheCanvas.drawRGB(255, 255, 255);
}
public void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {
    canvas.drawBitmap(cacheBitmap, 0, 0, null); // draws in 7-8 ms
}

The second sample creates a new bitmap without copying the original blank image.

Bitmap cacheBitmap;
Canvas cacheCanvas;
protected void onSizeChanged(int w, int h, int oldw, int oldh) {
    if (cacheBitmap != null) {
        cacheBitmap.recycle();
    }
    Resources res = getContext().getResources();
    Bitmap blankImage = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(res, R.drawable.blank);

    /* create fresh bitmap */
    cacheBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(w, h, blankImage.getConfig());
    /* create fresh bitmap */

    cacheCanvas = new Canvas();
    cacheCanvas.setBitmap(cacheBitmap);
    cacheCanvas.drawRGB(255, 255, 255);
}
public void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {
    canvas.drawBitmap(cacheBitmap, 0, 0, null); // draws in 40 ms
}

The first sample draws 5-6 times faster then the second sample, why is this? I'd like to be able to write this code in some way that doesn't even rely on the blank image, but no matter what I do I end up with a slow bitmap draw without having it available to copy initially.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Check the format of the bitmap. In older versions of Android, there was a bug (feature?) that would always use 565 for bitmaps without alpha and 8888 for bitmaps with alpha when creating the bitmap using certain functions.

I'm tempted to say that somehow one version uses 8888 while the other one uses 565, giving you the speed gain.

Use getConfig to investigate both bitmaps.

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The thing is, when I call cacheBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(w, h, Bitmap.Config.RGB_565) my draw calls take 30 ms and when I use cacheBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(w, h, Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888) my draw calls take 40 ms, so it's not just that. –  seanalltogether Aug 9 '11 at 0:52
5  
It was a feature :) –  Romain Guy Aug 9 '11 at 1:46
    
@Romain: I know :) I followed that bug closely. Kinda funny to hear you talk about Android, ever since I started following you on Google+, it feels like you spend all day traveling the world and taking pictures :) –  EboMike Aug 9 '11 at 4:26
    
Ha! I wish I was. –  Romain Guy Aug 9 '11 at 18:46
    
@Romain: Okay, I was thread-jacking a bit here. Seeems like the problem is not necessarily 565/8888 alone, as per the first comment here. Since you're the man for all things rendering in Android, do you have any idea where this performance difference is coming from? @seanalltogether: What do you get for getConfig when you try it on the first code snippet? –  EboMike Aug 10 '11 at 1:27

Couldn't it be that the createScaledBitmap() actually creates a new bitmap with exactly the proportions needed for the screen, giving a 1:1 pixel draw internally and probably allowing for a faster drawing routine, where the second just creates a new bitmap which contains ALL of the information for the original resource (probably a lot of extra pixels) and each call to draw the bitmap results in an internal scaling between the pixels in the internal bitmap and the canvas that is being drawn to?

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