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I'm working on a website where disabled access is one of the primary requirements. To do this, I've implemented a Javascript font size increase/decrease function that works great.

However, the div element where the resized text resides changes height based on the text size while everything else stays the same. Width doesn't change, but the height property set to 100% makes no difference. What changes to the CSS are necessary to keep the height fixed? so the footer content as well as the content element background stay the same?

This is the container element where all other divs are nested inside:

#container{
  width:1000px;
  height:100%;
  background-color:#FEFFF1;
  margin: 0 auto;
  margin-top:5px;
  text-align: left;
  font-size:1.4em;  
  border: 1px dotted black;
  overflow:scroll;
}

This is the content element, where the page-unique content goes:

#content{
  float:left;
  margin-top: 223px;
  margin-left:250px;
  height:100%;
  width: 70%;
  overflow:auto;
  padding-bottom:120px;
  position:relative;
}

EDIT changed container overflow value to scroll, where it should have been originally.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't allow the containers that hold the text to expand with the text, then what's the point of letting people resize the text?

Note that text-size is not an issue for 'disabled' people. It's an issue for everyone. On the plus side, we're finally at the point where browsers are adding this as a much more usable and findable feature than in the past. As such, writing your own JS based text-resizing widgets isn't as big of a deal as it once was.

To answer your specific question, height, in CSS, refers to the height of the page (at the outer level) or whatever container it is nested within. It will exceed said height if need be if the contents overflows, unless you provide an overflow value of SCROLL or HIDDEN, which, again, defeats the purpose of the font resizing. Your best bet is to make sure your page design/layout can handle variable font sizes.

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My issue is I want the text to expand /contract while keeping the parent container's dimensions the same. After 2 text decrease calls, the container element is very different dimension-wise than it was originally. – Jason Aug 9 '11 at 2:54
    
If the issue is that it's getting too short, then look into the min-height property. If the issue is that it's getting to tall, then there isn't an easy fix. – DA. Aug 9 '11 at 2:59

Just specify a fixed height instead of a percentage. As in

share|improve this answer
    
Whoops. say height: 100px – lettucemode Aug 9 '11 at 2:48
    
problem with that is each browser window height is different. I could do something with JS, but would prefer to stick with CSS only – Jason Aug 9 '11 at 2:55

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