Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
template<typename T> ClassA
{
    ...
    ClassA& operator=(const ClassA&);

    ...
};

// case one:
template<typename T>
ClassA<T>& ClassA<T>::operator=(const ClassA &rhs)
{ ... }

// case two:
template<typename T>
ClassA<T>& ClassA<T>::operator=(const ClassA<T> &rhs)
{ ... }

I assume case one is correct.

Question> Why we don't have to use ClassA<T> in the function parameter list such as in case two?

share|improve this question
    
+1, Because it is implied. –  iammilind Aug 9 '11 at 3:08
    
I have been told that "we must specify the template parameters for the name of a class template except inside the scope of the class itself. Here the function parameter is NOT inside the scope of classA, so I thought we MUST use case two instead of one." –  q0987 Aug 9 '11 at 3:11
    
@iammilind: you vote up because of the impliedness? –  phresnel Aug 9 '11 at 6:31
    
@phresnel. It was a short-hand :). +1 for good question. "Because it is implied", is what I think is the answer. –  iammilind Aug 9 '11 at 6:37
    
@iammilind: Ah, I see :D –  phresnel Aug 9 '11 at 7:54
add comment

2 Answers

As you have seen, either version will work.

Once we have passed the ClassA<T>:: part of ClassA<T>& ClassA<T>::operator=(const ClassA& rhs) it behaves as if we were inside the class. For example, the operator can access all the members of the class.

You do have to specify the full name for the return value, because at that point we still don't know that this is a member function (or operator).

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's implied when it's in function parameter scope (but not in the return type). See also using nested classes as a parameter type.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.