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I have this code:

void
fill_array (unsigned int *iarray, char *string, int max)
{
  int ipos = 0;
  char *iholder;

  iholder = strtok (string, ",");
  while (iholder != NULL)
    {
      iarray[ipos++] = atoi (iholder);
      if (ipos == max)
    {
      return;
    }
      iholder = strtok (NULL, ",");
    }

}

It takes a string "1,2,3,4" for example, and enters the numbers into an array. I put this in a loop and got 3.3 seconds runtime.

With this code:

void
fill_array (unsigned int *iarray, char *string, int max)
{
  int ipos = 0;
  char *iholder;
  if (!strchr (string, ','))
    {
      iarray[0] = atoi (string);
      return;
    }
  iholder = strtok (string, ",");
  while (iholder != NULL)
    {
      iarray[ipos++] = atoi (iholder);
      if (ipos == max)
    {
      return;
    }
      iholder = strtok (NULL, ",");
    }

}

It took about 1.4 seconds to execute.

The only difference is the strchr which I inserted just to see if it would run faster on single numbers, but it runs much faster on longer lists for some reason.

Can anyone explain why?

I am testing with this code:

int main ()
{
  unsigned int iarray[5];
  char str_test[] = "56,75,22,83";
  int i;
  struct timeval start;
  struct timeval end;

  gettimeofday (&start, NULL);


  for (i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    {
      fill_array (iarray, str_test, 5);
    }

  gettimeofday (&end, NULL);
  if (end.tv_usec - start.tv_usec < 0)
    {
      end.tv_usec += 1000000L;
      end.tv_sec -= 1;
    }

  printf ("Runtime: %ld s %03ld ms\n",
      end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec, (end.tv_usec - start.tv_usec) / 1000);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Presumably that first strchr is making your code drop out earlier so that it doesn't have to do as much processing?

share|improve this answer
    
Thats what I thought, but I printed out the array, and its filled with all the numbers in the list. –  ZPS Aug 9 '11 at 6:44
    
seems not correct as if "1,2,3,4" is passed, it will never come in strchr check. and theoretically it should take more time as processing one extra function call. –  Ummar Aug 9 '11 at 6:47
1  
I am stupid, and missed the obvious. strtok modifies the string that it is passed. After the first pass, it does drop out after that strchr. –  ZPS Aug 9 '11 at 6:53

Seems strange? Are you testing both codes on same machine? and how many times do you have taken the sample? and what is the code you are using to calculate time? please share that as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I tested it on Windows with Dev-c++ and a Debian machine, both yielded quicker runtimes by adding the strchr. –  ZPS Aug 9 '11 at 6:43
    
Are you using profiler for time measurement or you have written some code for that? if so, please share it. –  Ummar Aug 9 '11 at 6:46
    
@ZPS, remember that strtok does modify the contents of string you are passing, and as you are passing one string again and again, so I think that after first execution the string passed will not contain the actual value "56,75,22,83" in that. Test one thing, print the contents of string parameter also, and loop less time for debug say 2 times. –  Ummar Aug 9 '11 at 7:03
    
Yeah your right Ummar, I copied the passed string into a temporary variable and ran the tests again. They turned out as expected –  ZPS Aug 9 '11 at 8:09

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