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I am creating table with sqlalchemy.

user = Table('users', Metadata,
Column('datecreated', TIMESTAMP,                                  
            server_default=text('CURRENT_TIMESTAMP')),            
Column('datemodified', TIMESTAMP,                                 
               server_onupdate=text('CURRENT_TIMESTAMP')),
)

But this will not set DEFAULT ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP.

I check this link, How do you get SQLAlchemy to override MySQL "on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP" but that will for literal I need to wire that in create table definition.

Thx in advance :)

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Until MySQL 5.6. in one table, you can only have one 'automated' TIMESTAMP column.

From: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/timestamp.html

For one TIMESTAMP column in a table, you can assign the current timestamp as the default value and the auto-update value. It is possible to have the current timestamp be the default value for initializing the column, for the auto-update value, or both. It is not possible to have the current timestamp be the default value for one column and the auto-update value for another column.

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if i will write user = Table('users', Metadata, Column('datecreated', DateTime), Column('datemodified', TIMESTAMP, server_onupdate=text('CURRENT_TIMESTAMP')), ) Then it will work for DEFAULT ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP? –  Lafada Aug 9 '11 at 8:34
    
I checked with this example but it's not set the DEFAULT ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. when we use for single column. :( –  Lafada Aug 9 '11 at 8:38
    
If this is not possible then also please let me know how can i set onupdate trigger in sqlalchemy? –  Lafada Aug 9 '11 at 9:09
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You can hijack the server_default to set also the ON UPDATE:

Column('datemodified', TIMESTAMP,
       server_default=text('CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP'))

This generates the following column entry:

datemodified TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

However, Mchl's answer still applies: There can be only one automated TIMESTAMP column in a table (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/timestamp.html)

Also note that the order of the columns is of importance! If you have a TIMESTAMP column without DEFAULT and ON UPDATE modifiers, and it is the first TIMESTAMP column in your table, it automatically will be set to DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/timestamp.html)

So this is fine:

Column('datemodified', TIMESTAMP,
       server_default=text('CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP'))
Column('datecreated', TIMESTAMP)

while this is not:

Column('datecreated', TIMESTAMP)
Column('datemodified', TIMESTAMP,
       server_default=text('CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP'))

In order to set the `datecreated' to the current time during first entry of a row, just set its value explicitly to NULL. Again, from http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/timestamp.html:

By default, TIMESTAMP columns are NOT NULL, cannot contain NULL values, and assigning NULL assigns the current timestamp.

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Column('datemodified',
       TIMESTAMP,                                 
       server_onupdate=text(
           ' ON UPDATE '.join([str(func.current_timestamp())] * 2)))

This way you use SQLAlchemy's inner func.current_timestamp() function.

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