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If I want to exclude problems with enums and type redefinition in C++ I can use the code:

struct VertexType
{
    enum
    {
        Vector2 = 1,
        Vertor3 = 2,
        Vector4 = 3,
    };
};

struct Vector2 { ... };
struct Vector3 { ... };
struct Vector3 { ... };

Is there a way to remove the wrapper above enum. I looked at C++0x but didn't find addiditional inforamtion about solving this problem.

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1  
I might be slow, but could someone explain what the problem is with the current code exactly ? Wouldn't a namespace solve this ? –  ereOn Aug 9 '11 at 7:15
    
In C# I could just define an enum without any wrapper because enum elemetns can be accessed only like EnumName.EnumElement, in C++ EnumElement belongs to a global scope and can be accessed without EnumName::. –  MaxFX Aug 9 '11 at 7:22
    
I.e. in C#, EnumName is the wrapper (namespace). –  MSalters Aug 9 '11 at 7:59
    
namespace is the most immediate solution. But C++ templates are the usual way of enumerating over (or even generating) types. Consider template< int N > struct vector { enum { dimensions = N }; ... };. This allows simple translation between the numbers and the types. You can implement a general case and/or specific classes as you already have. –  Potatoswatter Aug 9 '11 at 10:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about namespace?

namespace VertexType
{
    enum V
    {
        Vector2 = 1,
        Vertor3 = 2,
        Vector4 = 3,
    };
}

struct Vector2 { ... };
struct Vector3 { ... };
struct Vector4 { ... };
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Namespace looks better than struct. But don't you know does C++0x add the local scope for enum elements? –  MaxFX Aug 9 '11 at 7:26
3  
Yep, namespace is the right way to limit the scope of enumerators, I prefer doing it this way. As a bonus you get argument-dependent name lookup. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Aug 9 '11 at 7:28
    
And I can't use a namespace for wrapping an enum if I want to create an enum type field; –  MaxFX Aug 9 '11 at 7:28
1  
@MaxFX: Of course you can. The enum type is named VertexType::V –  MSalters Aug 9 '11 at 8:00

Since you are talking about C++0x, just use the new enum class syntax:

enum class VertexType {
   Vector1 = 1,
   Vector2 = 2,
   Vector4 = 3
};

The enumerator values will only be accessible through the VertexType type as in VertexType::Vector1.

Some quotes from the standard:

§7.2/2 [...] The enum-keys enum class and enum struct are semantically equivalent; an enumeration type declared with one of these is a scoped enumeration, and its enumerators are scoped enumerators. [...]

§7.2/10 [...] Each scoped enumerator is declared in the scope of the enumeration.[...]

// example in §7.2/10
enum class altitude { high=’h’, low=’l’ };
void h() {
  altitude a;        // OK
  a = high;          // error: high not in scope
  a = altitude::low; // OK
}
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+1. Nice feature I knew nothing about. Has this anything to do with the Java enums (which are classes and can have methods) ? –  ereOn Aug 9 '11 at 14:14

It appears vector3 is already being used. You can do what your trying to do, however, vector3 cannot be used.

enum //VertexType
{
    Vector2 = 1,
    //Vector3 = 2,
    Vector4 = 3,
};

struct Vector2 { ... };
//struct Vector3 {  };
struct Vector3 { ... };

This works for me, no errors at all.

This is a link i found. http://www.kixor.net/dev/vector3/

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