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I seem to be having an issue with Java Web Start not running my application correctly. When I run the code as an application (i.e. without web start) the following code results in the stopping of sound that is being played, and the halting of an animation.

if (evt.getSource() == stopButton)
{   
    if (clipPlayer != null)
    {
        //Stop the sound from playing
        clipPlayer.stopPlaying();
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < rhythmWheel.NUM_WHEELS; i++)
    {
        rhythmWheel.getWheelPanels()[i].wheel.setRotationAngle(0);
    }
    //Stop the wheel from rotating.
    paintTimer.stop();
}

However, when this code is run through web start, the sound stops playing, but the animation continues. I believe that this is caused by the Timer continuing to fire events, because removing the actionListener from the Timer results in the animation stopping even in web start.

How can I force the application to make the Timer stop firing events when run in Java Web Start?

share|improve this question
    
I suspect that your program has a bug, but that it is in another part of your code, in code not shown here. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 9 '11 at 10:34
    
While I'm certain the programme could have bugs, I'd like to know why this bug appears in the program when run under Java Web Start, and not when run as an application. – Varun Madiath Aug 9 '11 at 10:43
    
I can't explain it yet either, but I suggest that you use debug statements and try whittling down your code, try simplifying your program until you isolate the problem. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 9 '11 at 12:27
    
The webstart demo from Animated Icon works fine. So you either have a version/platform problem or a logic problem in the code somewhere. – camickr Aug 9 '11 at 15:03

I believe you have an uncaught exception in your code.

First of all, learn to invoke your JNLP file manually with javaws so you can see what is printed to the console. E.g. javaws foo.jnlp.

If this isn't enough, then add print statements (or log statements if you use logging) so you can SEE that the final statement is actually reached.

Try

if (evt.getSource() == stopButton)
{   
    if (clipPlayer != null)
    {
        //Stop the sound from playing
        clipPlayer.stopPlaying();
    }
    System.out.println("after stopPlaying(). rhythmWheel.NUM_WHEELS=" + rhythmWheel.NUM_WHEELS);
    for (int i = 0; i < rhythmWheel.NUM_WHEELS; i++)
    {
        rhythmWheel.getWheelPanels()[i].wheel.setRotationAngle(0);
       System.out.println("set " + i + " to 0");
    }
    //Stop the wheel from rotating.
    paintTimer.stop();
    System.out.println("stop() called");
}

If you see "stop() called" the timer should stop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for telling me about running the jnlp file with javaws. It might be useful later. Currently however java forks a new vm to run the applet and I can't see the output in the terminal. However I have the java console enabled, and I have been checking for exceptions there. – Varun Madiath Aug 9 '11 at 7:46
    
I tried what you suggested, but I can confirm that there is no uncaught exception. I see the "stop() called" message being printed in the java console, but the animation doesn't stop. – Varun Madiath Aug 9 '11 at 7:49
    
Interesting. Can you create a very small program showing the same behaviour? – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 10 '11 at 7:45
    
I'm attempting to locate a subset of the code that replicates the problem. Sadly this is code I've inherited and everything is very deeply coupled. – Varun Madiath Aug 15 '11 at 7:20

I'd like to know why this bug appears in the program when run under Java Web Start.

Verify that you are constructing the GUI on the event dispatch thread. This is required for Swing applets, too. may be altering the timing just enough to expose the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm constructing the GUI using SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait. Thats what the link you mentioned suggests for applets. Should the code that calls Timer.stop() run from the EDT? – Varun Madiath Aug 10 '11 at 7:44
    
javax.swing.Timer notifies listeners on the EDT. An sscce would help. – trashgod Aug 10 '11 at 16:57
    
I'm working on getting together an sscce that shows the same behaviour. – Varun Madiath Aug 15 '11 at 7:21
    
This example that uses javax.swing.Timer in an applet may be useful for reference. Also, check isRunning() and see if the Timer therad is getting saturated. – trashgod Aug 15 '11 at 7:29

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