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I want to make sure that an element is present before the webdriver starts doing stuff.

I'm trying to get something like this to work:

WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, new TimeSpan(0,0,5));
wait.Until(By.Id("login"));

I'm mainly struggling how to setup up the anynomous function..

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14 Answers 14

up vote 53 down vote accepted

Alternatively you can use implicit wait:

driver.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));

An implicit wait is to tell WebDriver to poll the DOM for a certain amount of time when trying to find an element or elements if they are not immediately available. The default setting is 0. Once set, the implicit wait is set for the life of the WebDriver object instance.

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1  
thanks, the new syntax is : driver.manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS); –  Reda Balkouch Jun 7 '13 at 15:16
    
I'd love to see this in node with admc/wd. –  190290000 Ruble Man Jul 26 '13 at 21:55
7  
@RedaBalkouch, the syntax Mike used in his Answer is correct. It's C# –  diemogebhardt Apr 22 '14 at 9:44

Using the solution provided by Mike Kwan may have an impact in overall testing performance, since the implicit wait will be used in all FindElement calls. Many times you'll want the FindElement to fail right away when an element is not present (you're testing for a malformed page, missing elements, etc.). With the implicit wait these operations would wait for the whole timeout to expire before throwing the exception. The default implicit wait is set to 0 seconds.

I've written a little extension method to to IWebDriver that adds a timeout (in seconds) parameter to the FindElement() method. It's quite self-explanatory:

public static class WebDriverExtensions
{
    public static IWebElement FindElement(this IWebDriver driver, By by, int timeoutInSeconds)
    {
        if (timeoutInSeconds > 0)
        {
            var wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(timeoutInSeconds));
            return wait.Until(drv => drv.FindElement(by));
        }
        return driver.FindElement(by);
    }
}

I didn't cache the WebDriverWait object as its creation is very cheap, this extension may be used simultaneously for different WebDriver objects, and I only do optimizations when ultimately needed.

Usage is straight-forward:

var driver = new FirefoxDriver();
driver.Navigate().GoToUrl("http://localhost/mypage");
var btn = driver.FindElement(By.CssSelector("#login_button"));
btn.Click();
var employeeLabel = driver.FindElement(By.CssSelector("#VCC_VSL"), 10);
Assert.AreEqual("Employee", employeeLabel.Text);
driver.Close();
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33  
In case someone wonder, WebDriverWait are from the OpenQA.Selenium.Support.UI namespace and comes in a separate package called Selenium WebDriver Support Classes on NuGet –  Ved Sep 11 '13 at 1:55
1  
@Ved i could kiss you <3 been looking for it in a different dll :D –  Adween Sep 17 '14 at 14:14
    
@Loudenvier Please make the first line bold so that it is more noticeable. Especially since it is not the accepted answer, although being a better and more precise approach. –  user1887402 Jul 9 at 7:29

You can also use

ExpectedConditions.ElementExists

So you will search for an element availability like that

new WebDriverWait(driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(timeOut)).Until(ExpectedConditions.ElementExists((By.Id(login))));

Source

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2  
This seems to work best. –  Keavon Mar 5 '14 at 22:33
    
Agreed, this is far more useful than a mere timeout (in cases where you're dynamically loading an object). –  keithl8041 Apr 2 '14 at 11:44

Here's a variation of @Loudenvier's solution that also works for getting multiple elements:

public static class WebDriverExtensions
{
    public static IWebElement FindElement(this IWebDriver driver, By by, int timeoutInSeconds)
    {
        if (timeoutInSeconds > 0)
        {
            var wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(timeoutInSeconds));
            return wait.Until(drv => drv.FindElement(by));
        }
        return driver.FindElement(by);
    }

    public static ReadOnlyCollection<IWebElement> FindElements(this IWebDriver driver, By by, int timeoutInSeconds)
    {
        if (timeoutInSeconds > 0)
        {
            var wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(timeoutInSeconds));
            return wait.Until(drv => (drv.FindElements(by).Count > 0) ? drv.FindElements(by) : null);
        }
        return driver.FindElements(by);
    }
}
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Nice! I've just added this to my own library! That's the beauty of sharing code!!! –  Loudenvier Nov 9 '12 at 18:01
1  
I'd suggest one addition to that. You could catch the NoSuchElement solution and return null in that instance. Then you could create an extension method called .exists that returns true unless the IWebElement is null. –  Brantley Blanchard Aug 2 '13 at 20:23

I Confused anyomous function with predicate. Heres a little helper method:

   WebDriverWait wait;
    private void waitForById(string id) 
    {
        if (wait == null)            
            wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, new TimeSpan(0,0,5));

        //wait.Until(driver);
        wait.Until(d => d.FindElement(By.Id(id)));
    }
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Inspired by Loudenvier's solution, here's an extension method that works for all ISearchContext objects, not just IWebDriver, which is a specialization of the former. This method also supports waiting until the element is displayed.

static class WebDriverExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Find an element, waiting until a timeout is reached if necessary.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="context">The search context.</param>
    /// <param name="by">Method to find elements.</param>
    /// <param name="timeout">How many seconds to wait.</param>
    /// <param name="displayed">Require the element to be displayed?</param>
    /// <returns>The found element.</returns>
    public static IWebElement FindElement(this ISearchContext context, By by, uint timeout, bool displayed=false)
    {
        var wait = new DefaultWait<ISearchContext>(context);
        wait.Timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(timeout);
        wait.IgnoreExceptionTypes(typeof(NoSuchElementException));
        return wait.Until(ctx => {
            var elem = ctx.FindElement(by);
            if (displayed && !elem.Displayed)
                return null;

            return elem;
        });
    }
}

Example usage:

var driver = new FirefoxDriver();
driver.Navigate().GoToUrl("http://localhost");
var main = driver.FindElement(By.Id("main"));
var btn = main.FindElement(By.Id("button"));
btn.Click();
var dialog = main.FindElement(By.Id("dialog"), 5, displayed: true);
Assert.AreEqual("My Dialog", dialog.Text);
driver.Close();
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If you've set an implicit wait such as _webDriver.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(Timeout); that will still trump the timeout value you set here. –  howcheng Mar 18 at 0:04
        //wait up to 5 seconds with no minimum for a UI element to be found
        WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(_pagedriver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
        IWebElement title = wait.Until<IWebElement>((d) =>
        {
            return d.FindElement(By.ClassName("MainContentHeader"));
        });
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The clickAndWait command doesn't get converted when you choose the Webdriver format in the Selenium IDE. Here is the workaround. Add the wait line below. Realistically, the problem was the click or event that happened before this one--line 1 in my C# code. But really, just make sure you have a WaitForElement before any action where you're referencing a "By" object.

HTML code:

<a href="http://www.google.com">xxxxx</a>

C#/NUnit code:

driver.FindElement(By.LinkText("z")).Click;
driver.WaitForElement(By.LinkText("xxxxx"));
driver.FindElement(By.LinkText("xxxxx")).Click();
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Python:

from selenium import webdriver
from selenium.webdriver.support import expected_conditions as EC
from selenium.webdriver.support.ui import WebDriverWait
from selenium.webdriver.common.by import By

driver.find_element_by_id('someId').click()

WebDriverWait(driver, timeout).until(EC.presence_of_element_located((By.ID, 'someAnotherId'))

from EC you can choose other conditions as well try this: http://selenium-python.readthedocs.org/api.html#module-selenium.webdriver.support.expected_conditions

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JAVA

@Test  
public void testUntitled() throws Exception {   
    driver.get("yourwebsite");   
    waitForID("ElementID");    
}

public void waitForID(String id)     {         
    WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, 10);      
    wait.until(ExpectedConditions.presenceOfElementLocated(By.id(id)));   
}
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You can find out something like this in C# .

This is what i used in JUnit - Selenium

WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(driver, 100);
WebElement element = wait.until(ExpectedConditions.elementToBeClickable(By.id("submit")));

Do import related packages

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Was searching how to wait in Selenium for condition, landed in this thread and here is what I use now:

    WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(m_driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
    wait.Until(d => ReadCell(row, col) != "");

ReadCell(row, col) != "" can be any condition. Like this way because:

  • it's mine
  • allows inlining
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    public bool doesWebElementExist(string linkexist)
    {
        try
        {
            driver.FindElement(By.XPath(linkexist));
            return true;
        }
        catch (NoSuchElementException e)
        {
            return false;

        }
    }
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Please add some information about your answer. –  Batuhan Coşkun Apr 27 at 12:22
    
The above code is to check whether the a particular element is present or not. –  Madhu Apr 28 at 4:39

I see multiple solutions already posted that work great! However, just in case anyone needs something else, I thought I would post two solutions that I personally used in selenium C# to test if an element is present! Hope it helps, cheers!

public static class IsPresent
{
    public static bool isPresent(this IWebDriver driver, By bylocator)
    {

        bool variable = false;
        try
        {
            IWebElement element = driver.FindElement(bylocator);
            variable = element != null;
        }
       catch (NoSuchElementException){

       }
        return variable; 
    }

}

Here is the second

    public static class IsPresent2
{
    public static bool isPresent2(this IWebDriver driver, By bylocator)
    {
        bool variable = true; 
        try
        {
            IWebElement element = driver.FindElement(bylocator);

        }
        catch (NoSuchElementException)
        {
            variable = false; 
        }
        return variable; 
    }

}
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