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I've got a function that takes a pointer to an object of a custom class (actually pointers to a base class such that polymorphism works). Within the calling routine this object however is exclusively needed for the purpose of this call, i.e. is temporary. For example like this:

class A { /** stuff */ };
class B : public A { /** stuff */ };

void doSomething( const A* const _p ) { /** stuff */ }

void callingRoutine()
{
  A* tempPointer = new B;
  doSomething( tempPointer );
  delete tempPointer;
}

Now, since I really only need the object of type B within the call to doSomething, is there a way to do it in one line? Doing

doSomething( new B );

creates memory leaks (valgrind says so). Or would

doSomething( &B );

be the recommended way? The latter compiles but gives warnings about passing pointers to temporary objects. This is what I want to do, but would it be safe this way?

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1  
Why create the object outside of doSomething's scope if you're only gonna use it within its scope? –  Bertrand Marron Aug 9 '11 at 9:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The cleanest way is to do

B b;
doSomething(&b);

But what you really should write depends of what the doSomething function does. If it's fine to destruct b at the end of callingRoutine, then it's the faster and cleaner way to do this, because allocating on the stack is faster than new and does not require you to delete b afterwards.

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he said one line! ;) –  Nim Aug 9 '11 at 9:06
    
True, but I can't think of a good one-line solution. :( –  Mr. kbok Aug 9 '11 at 9:09
    
Sometimes two lines are better than one :-) –  Nicola Musatti Aug 9 '11 at 9:10
    
@Nicola, of course - I'm nitpicking... ;) –  Nim Aug 9 '11 at 9:14
    
Two lines are fine. And then there is the workaround by iammilind ;-) –  janitor048 Aug 9 '11 at 9:19

In your case, you can use automatic variable (on stack)

void callingRoutine()
{
  B obj;
  doSomething( &obj );
}  // obj is destroyed automatically

This doesn't give warning. Moreover, you should use new only when you really want to have reference/access to the memory address outside the function scope for a longer time. Within a function block it doesn't make sense to allocate with new.

Refer this link from Bjarne's page, where he has pointed the exact example as yours.

By the way if you want just one line, then the solution will not be clean, but here is a work around:

B obj; doSomething( &obj );
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Nice workaround for the "one line" request ;-) Two lines are fine as well, I was merely wondering on what would be the "recommended" way in this situation.. –  janitor048 Aug 9 '11 at 9:14
    
@janitor048, recommended way will be the first part of the answer. Also you can refer the link for more info. –  iammilind Aug 9 '11 at 9:19
    
Just a note, but if you are doing this in the context of a larger function, it might be worthwhile to put the B obj; doSomething( &obj ); in {...}, so that obj is destructed as soon as possible. –  James Kanze Aug 9 '11 at 9:27
    
@James, true. In fact I would have put B obj; inside doSomething(); if I really don't need it after the method is called. :) –  iammilind Aug 9 '11 at 9:28

If you can change the signature of the called function, change it to:

void doSomething( A const& obj );

Then you can call it with:

doSomething( B() );

If you can't, should declare a local variable:

void callingRoutine()
{
    B temp;
    doSomething( &temp );
}

If the calling function is longer, and it is a problem if the temp is not immediately destructed, you can enclose it in additional {...}:

void callingRoutine()
{
    {
        B temp;
        doSomething( &temp );
    }
    //  More code here...
}

Generally speaking, however, if this is necessary, your functions are probably too long.

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I'm a little surprised nobody has pointed out the obvious:

void callingRoutine()
{
    doSomething(&B());
}

I have to wonder about the overall design that requires passing in a pointer to an object, but when it's done you apparently ignore the object it operated on, but if you're sure of what you want and the rest of what you're doing, this seems like the simplest, most straightforward way to achieve it.

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That was one of the possibilities I had in mind when asking the question, I also mentioned it in my original post (actually I wrote doSomething(&B) instead of doSomething(&B()), but my constructors take arguments anyways, thus it would be &B(x,y,z)). As for the general concept: I need to register different collections of data with an interface for storage / immediate output / later output. At least in the case of immediate output a temporary data collection is sufficient. And the pointers are needed to make use of virtual functions.. –  janitor048 Aug 11 '11 at 9:13

something like below maybe?

void doSomething( std::auto_ptr<A> _p ) { /** stuff */ }

void callingRoutine()
{
  doSomething(std::auto_ptr<A>(new B));
}
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Yes, this is something along the lines I had in mind. Thanks. But probably the others are right that in this specific case two lines and a temporary object on the stack are the most simple solution.. –  janitor048 Aug 9 '11 at 9:18
    
@janitor048, of course, my goal was to point out it could be done - but isn't really the idiomatic way of doing it... –  Nim Aug 9 '11 at 9:20
    
Sure, I realize that. And I appreciate your suggestion as it might come in handy in other situations. –  janitor048 Aug 9 '11 at 9:24
1  
doSomething(std::auto_ptr<A>(new B).get()); so as not to change the function signature? –  visitor Aug 9 '11 at 10:32
    
@visitor - ahh - missed a trick.. nice one.. –  Nim Aug 9 '11 at 11:15

The simplest way to solve your problem is to change your code as follows:

void callingRoutine()
{
    B temp;
    doSomething( &temp );
}

This works because you only need polymorphic access in doSomething() and this is guaranteed by the fact that you pass a pointer to temp by taking its address.

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Passing a pointer to a temporary object is generally a bad idea because the object could be destroyed before the callee finished using it. In your example, doSomething() should return before the object gets deleted or gets out of scope, so, until doSomething does not store any reference to the object, it's not a problem.

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You can cast a temporary value (r-value) to an l-value for the duration of the call or expression:

template<class T>
inline T& l_value(T const& t)
{
    return const_cast<T&>(t);
}

struct A {};

void doSomething(const A*);

void foo()
{
    doSomething(&l_value(A()));
}
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