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I have a class which analyzes a string and if the string is not null or an empty string, it creates a new String or new Date using the object depending on the type of subclass. If the string is null or empty it returns an empty string. Currently I call this class converter however I feel this name is misleading, is there a better name anyone can think of for what this class is doing? I want something intuitive that will make my code more readable. Thanks.

public abstract class Converter {
    Object returnObject;

    public Converter() {

    }

    public Object convert(String value)
    {
        if(!this.isEmpty(value))
        {
            this.setReturnObject(value);    
        }else
        {
            this.returnObject = "";
        }
        return this.getReturnObject();
    }

    protected boolean isEmpty(String value)
    {
        return (value != null && value.equalsIgnoreCase(""));
    }

    protected abstract void setReturnObject(String value);

    protected Object getReturnObject(){
        return this.returnObject;
    }
}

public class NumberConverter extends Converter {
    public NumberConverter() {
    }

    protected void setReturnObject(String value) {
        this.returnObject = new Number(Integer.parseInt(value));
    }
}
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1  
I think it belongs here: english.stackexchange.com :) –  MByD Aug 9 '11 at 9:57
2  
I think I'm in the right forum. Naming is a huge part of producing readable code at least according to the Uncle Bob books Clean Coder and Clean Code –  Kevin Bowersox Aug 9 '11 at 9:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use either EntityMapper or EntityTransformer.

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I like Transformer –  Kevin Bowersox Aug 9 '11 at 10:02
1  
more than meets the eye.... –  Adriaan Koster Aug 9 '11 at 11:04

The 'Entity' prefix is not appropriate because the class is not taking an entity, but a String.

I also would not choose transformer (or converter) because the original value does not change (being an immutable String kind of rules that out).

I would go for StringMapper or maybe StringParser (as suggested by Burleigh Bear).

On a side note, you could use generics to specify the mapped/parsed types and make this code a bit more typesafe.

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i guess abstract class doesnt contain any method definations inside it...!! better check that thing first..!!

and as far as naming is concerned i would give agree with sathwick. Thanks. :)

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abstract class can contain method definitions in it. It is a valid case. Only interfaces can not have method definitions in it. –  Sathwick Aug 9 '11 at 10:10
    
@indyaah, I'm not sure what you mean by abstract class doesn't contain any method definitions inside it? If you mean abstract methods that the implementers must override did you see: protected abstract void setReturnObject(String value); ? –  Kevin Bowersox Aug 9 '11 at 10:11
    
yeah.. my mistake... i guess i got confused in between abstract class and interface. –  indyaah Aug 9 '11 at 10:24

Since you're taking a string and parsing it, I'd say "Parser".

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