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Here is a C code snippet

char *p="Hello World";
int a;
char b;
printf("%d\n",sizeof(p++));
printf("%c\n",*p);

printf("%d",sizeof(a,b));
printf("%d",sizeof(b,a));

Here is the output

4
H
1
4

Can anybody explain why p didn't get incremented and what is the use of comma operator here. I read that it has something to do with VLAs.

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Is this homework ? –  Paul R Aug 9 '11 at 11:14
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

p didn't get incremented because sizeof does not evaluate its operand, it just uses the type of the expression.

sizeof is an operator taking a single expression as its operand, not a parenthesized argument list. So, in sizeof(a,b), the single operand is (a,b). The comma in sizeof(a,b) therefore is the comma operator -- unlike the comma in printf("%c\n", *p), which is an argument separator and not the comma operator.

When evaluated, the comma operator first evaluates its left-hand side, then evaluates the right-hand side. The result of the operator is the result of the right-hand side. So, although (a,b) isn't evaluated, the type of the expression is the type of the right-hand side. Hence sizeof(a,b) is equivalent to sizeof(b). Really there's no "use" of the comma operator here, at least no useful use. It's pointless other than to test your ability to read it.

It has nothing to do with VLAs (variable-length arrays).

What does have to do with VLAs is that when sizeof is applied to a VLA, it is defined to evaluate the expression (6.5.3.4/2 in C99). The size of a VLA is of course not known at compile-time.

But, when used on the RHS of a comma operator, the name of a VLA decays to a pointer just like any other array does. This is 6.3.2.1/3: there are three cases where an array does not decay, and "the operand of sizeof" is one of them but "the RHS of a comma operator" is not. So:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int a = 10;
    int b[a]; // VLA
    const char *p = "Hello";
    printf("%d\n", sizeof(++p, b));
    printf("%d\n", sizeof b);
    printf("%c", *p);
}

prints (on my machine):

4
40
H

because in the first sizeof, even though there's a VLA on the RHS of the comma operator, the type of the operand of sizeof is int*, not a VLA, and so (++p, b) is not evaluated. In the second sizeof, the type of the operand is a VLA, which is evaluated, and its size is 10*sizeof(int).

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1  
It is not true that sizeof doesn't evaluate its operand, it does evaluate it during pre-processing, but the operand is simply not included in the resulting binary, it was replaced by a number. If you type printf("%d\n",sizeof(a + b)); you can see that you get the result 4, because the operand was evaluated according to the integer promotion and balancing rules. –  Lundin Aug 9 '11 at 11:25
1  
@Lundin: that's not evaluating the operand, that's just parsing it. We know that the type resulting from adding an int and a char is int, without performing the addition itself. See 6.5.3.4/2 (which also points out that I need to edit my answer...) –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '11 at 11:35
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Im assuming a typical 32-bit CPU in the answers below:

printf("%d\n",sizeof(p++));

sizeof is evaluated during pre-processing into a number, it doesn't get executed in any way. Therefore the pre-processor translates the expression to printf("%d\n",4); This is the reason why sizeof() cannot contain any side effects such as changing a variable.

printf("%d",sizeof(a,b));

The evaluation of the comma operator is always guarnteed to be left to right. Which is actually the only use for that operator: predictable order of evaluation. In 99.9% of all production code, the comma operator fills no purpose. So the code is equal to this:

a;
printf("%d",sizeof(b));

Of course, a; doesn't do anything useful, it is a null statement. And the result in this case has nothing to do with sizeof().

EDIT: from the C standard 9899:1999 6.5.17

The left operand of a comma operator is evaluated as a void expression; there is a sequence point after its evaluation. Then the right operand is evaluated; the result has its type and value.

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acc to you the answer should be 4 as a is an int, but the ans is 1 –  Atishay Aug 9 '11 at 11:28
    
Sorry I managed to mix up a and b. I have edited my post. –  Lundin Aug 9 '11 at 11:31
    
Order of evaluation isn't strictly the only use of a comma operator. It can be used to shoe-horn two expressions into a context that only allows one, even if you don't care which order they're evaluated in. For example, the third clause of a for loop: void reverse(char *input) { if (*input) { for (char *l = input, *r = input+strlen(input)-1; l < r; ++l, --r) { char tmp = *r; *r = *l; *l = tmp; }}}. ++l is nominally executed before --r, but that's not why we're using the comma operator, and we wouldn't care if they were evaluated in the other order. –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '11 at 11:48
    
@Steve I don't agree that "shoe-horning" is a valid use though. I know that plenty of code like the one in your example exists, but at least to me it is just obfuscation and hard to read. I would instead only keep one loop iterator per for loop expression, and if something else needs to be increased at the same time as well, I'd initialize it separately before the loop is started, and increase it as the last thing done before the end of the loop. –  Lundin Aug 9 '11 at 13:03
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sizeof operator is a compiler function (e.g. calculated to constant at compile time).

  1. This means: p++ is ignored, only the type of p is used.
  2. When there is a comma, the last parameter is used (so, for example sizeof(a,b) is like sizeof(b))
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sizeof is not always calculated at compile time, for example, with variable-length arrays. –  dreamlax Aug 9 '11 at 11:16
    
I was not aware of that, thank you. (though it is not related to this question) –  MByD Aug 9 '11 at 11:18
1  
It is not true that sizeof doesn't evaluate its operand, it does evaluate it during pre-processing, but the operand is simply not included in the resulting binary, it was replaced by a number. If you type printf("%d\n",sizeof(a + b)); you can see that you get the result 4, because the operand was evaluated according to the integer promotion and balancing rules. –  Lundin Aug 9 '11 at 11:24
    
@Lundin: you are failing to distinguish between evaluating the sizeof, and evaluating the operand of the sizeof. It is false to say that sizeof evaluates its operand, at compile-time or any other time, unless the operand has a VLA type. The standard clearly states that it doesn't. –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '11 at 11:54
    
@Steve My point is that sizeof doesn't magically get a type handed to it depending on what the type of the variable handed to it happened to be. It has to understand the expression, and what operator that is being used in it, to know which implicit type promotions to use. And regarding who evaluates what... what about the case where the operand of sizeof contains only constants? Take this for example: sizeof(1<2? a : b). The operand must and will be evaluated for sizeof to know what type that's referred to. –  Lundin Aug 9 '11 at 12:53
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