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I'm at the moment playing with the MailboxProcessor. Therefore I made up a few agents that can crawl a directory on the computer, and all subdirectories - and then print the files in each directory:

let fileCollector =
  MailboxProcessor.Start(fun self -> 
    let rec loop() =
      async { let! file = self.Receive()
              printfn "%s" file
              return! loop() }
    loop()) 

let folderCollector = 
  MailboxProcessor.Start(fun self -> 
    let rec loop() =
      async { let! dir = self.Receive()
              do! Async.StartChild(
                    async { let! files = Directory.AsyncGetFiles dir
                            for z in files do fileCollector.Post z }) |> Async.Ignore
              return! loop() }
    loop())

let crawler =
  MailboxProcessor.Start(fun self ->
    let rec loop() =
      async { let! dir = self.Receive()
              folderCollector.Post dir
              do! Async.StartChild(
                    async { let! dirs = Directory.AsyncGetDirectories dir
                            for z in dirs do self.Post z }) |> Async.Ignore
              return! loop() }
    loop())

crawler.Post @"C:\Projects"

printfn "Done" // Message getting fired right away, due to the async stuff.

Now how would I tell when the folderCollector, fileCollector and crawler are done, so that the printfn statement at the end, would be called AFTER the crawler successfully have crawled all subdirectories and printed all files?

Update: By using the technique showen by Tomas Petricek in http://tomasp.net/blog/parallel-extra-image-pipeline.aspx, I've managed to make up following code:

let folders = new BlockingQueueAgent<string>(100)
let files = new BlockingQueueAgent<string>(100)

let rec folderCollector path =
  async { do! folders.AsyncAdd(path)
          do! Async.StartChild(
                  async { let! dirs = Directory.AsyncGetDirectories path
                          for z in dirs do
                            do! folderCollector z }) |> Async.Ignore }

let fileCollector =
  async { while true do
            let! dir = folders.AsyncGet()
            do! Async.StartChild(
                    async { let! fs = Directory.AsyncGetFiles dir
                            for z in fs do
                              do! files.AsyncAdd z }) |> Async.Ignore }

let rec printFiles() =
  async { let! file = files.AsyncTryGet(75)
          match file with
          | Some s -> 
            printfn "%s" s
            return! displayFiles()
          | None -> () }

let cts = new CancellationTokenSource()
Async.Start(folderCollector @"C:\Projects", cts.Token)
Async.Start(fileCollector, cts.Token)
Async.RunSynchronously(printFiles(), cancellationToken = cts.Token)

printfn "DONE!"

Update: Update: Alright, so I've mixed up following code:

let folders = new BlockingQueueAgent<string option>(10)
let files = new BlockingQueueAgent<string option>(10)

let folderCollector path =
  async { let rec loop path = 
            async { do! folders.AsyncAdd(Some path)
                    let! dirs = Directory.AsyncGetDirectories path
                    do! [ for z in dirs -> loop z ] |> Async.Parallel |> Async.Ignore } 
          do! loop path 
          do! folders.AsyncAdd(None) }

let rec fileCollector() =
  async { let! dir = folders.AsyncGet 125
          match dir with
          | Some s -> 
            let fs = Directory.GetFiles s
            do! [ for z in fs -> printfn "%s" z; files.AsyncAdd(Some z) ] |> Async.Parallel |> Async.Ignore // <-- Fails silence if files are full
            do! fileCollector() // <-- unreachable
          | None -> printfn "Done!"; ()}

That looks fine eh? For some reason at the do! fileCollector() line in the fileCollector() function, wont execute if the files BlockingQueueAgent is full. Instead it fails silence.

However if I do:

let folderCollector path =
  async { let rec loop path = 
            async { do! folders.AsyncAdd(Some path)
                    let! dirs = Directory.AsyncGetDirectories path
                    do! [ for z in dirs -> loop z ] |> Async.Parallel |> Async.Ignore } 
          do! loop path 
          do! folders.AsyncAdd(None) }

let rec fileCollector() =
  async { let! dir = folders.AsyncGet 75
          match dir with
          | Some s -> 
            let fs = Directory.GetFiles s
            do! Async.StartChild(async { do! [ for z in fs -> printfn "%s" z; files.AsyncAdd(Some z) ] 
                                             |> Async.Parallel |> Async.Ignore } ) |> Async.Ignore
            do! fileCollector()
          | None -> printfn "Done!"; ()}

It works just fine. However now I cant keep track of when the fileCollector is done, since it's running a bunch of async computations, and therefore even when it gets to "None" in the queue, it might still have some work to do. What's going on?


Update: I've modified the fileCollector to same "style" as folderCollector, but the problem remains. The modified version:

let fileCollector() =
  async { let rec loop() = 
            async { let! dir = folders.AsyncGet 750
                    match dir with
                    | Some s -> 
                      let! fs = Directory.AsyncGetFiles s
                      do! [ for z in fs -> printfn "%A" z; files.AsyncAdd(Some z) ] 
                            |> Async.Parallel |> Async.Ignore 
                      return! loop()
                    | None -> printfn "Done!"; () }
          do! loop()
          printfn "after" // Never gets this far... 
          do! files.AsyncAdd(None) }
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To answer your second question (from the comment) regarding the updated version based on pipelines - I think you could use BlockingQueueAgent<option<string>> and use the value None when you finished generating all files (the None value would then propagate through the pipeline and you could end all workflows when they get None).

To do that, you need to modify folderCollector to actually detect when it finishes iterating. It is not tested, but the following should work (the point is that you need to wait for a completion of the recursive call):

let rec folderCollector path =
  let rec loop path = 
    async { do! folders.AsyncAdd(Some path)
            let! dirs = Directory.AsyncGetDirectories path
            do! [ for z in dirs do -> folderCollector z ] 
                |> Async.Parallel |> Async.Ignore }
  async { do! loop path
          do! folders.AsyncAdd(None) }

All workflows would potentially get None as a result of AsyncGet. When that happens, they should send None to the next worker in the pipeline. The last one can terminate when it receives None:

let rec printFiles() =
  async { let! file = files.AsyncGet(75) // Note - now we use just AsyncGet
          match file with
          | Some s -> 
            printfn "%s" s
            return! displayFiles()
          | None -> () } // Completed processing all files
share|improve this answer
    
please see my post update! :) - I'm not sure whether it's just me, but it seems like there is a bug laying around in the BlockingQueueAgent.. (I've used the exact same code as in your blog post for the agent type). –  ebb Aug 10 '11 at 15:43
1  
@ebb - I think you'll need to modify fileCollector in a similar way as folderCollector (so that they can both keep track of end). Aslo, use return! for recursive calls instead of do! (it is more efficient) –  Tomas Petricek Aug 10 '11 at 16:09
    
(see updated post) I've tried to modify the filCollector in a similar way as folderCollector, but the problem remains... I must be overlooking something completely simple, but yet I fail to see what. –  ebb Aug 10 '11 at 16:49
    
I figured it out! When you add something to BlockingAgentQueue, and the count of the queue is equal to the maximum length, it simply enqueue the value to the pending queue - BUT! It does NOT reply on a channel, and therefore if the current queue is full and I keep adding to it, it will suddenly stop when it reach the maximum length, due to no respond. I'm not sure whether that's intended behaviour or not, but it did for sure give me a headache. Anyway, thanks for the help! I appreciate it a lot. –  ebb Aug 11 '11 at 0:11
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There is no built-in support for notifying you when an F# agent completes. It is actually quite difficult to tell. An agent, even with an empty queue, has not completed, because it can still receive messages from other agents and start working again.

In your example, the work is done when the queues of all three agents are empty. This can be checked using CurrentQueueLength. This isn't very nice solution, but it will work:

crawler.Post @"C:\Temp"
// Busy waiting until all queues are empty
while crawler.CurrentQueueLength <> 0 || folderCollector.CurrentQueueLength <> 0 ||
      fileCollector.CurrentQueueLength <> 0 do
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10)
printfn "Done"

I think a better approach would be to structure your code differently - you don't really need to use an agent for recursively processing a directory tree. In your version, the walking of directories (crawler agent) is done in parallel with finding files in folders (folderCollector) and processing the results (fileCollector), so you're essentially implementing a three-step pipeline.

You can implement pipelines more easily using just async with a blocking queues used to store immediate results of the processing. This article shows an example with image processing. I think the same approach would work for you too. Detecting when a pipeline processing ends should be easier (After sending all inputs, you could send a special message indicating completion and when the message gets to the end of the pipeline, you're done).

Another alternative would be to use asynchronous sequences, which may be a good pattern for this kind of problem (but there are no good samples online at the moment).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick answer :) - I did actually have a look at your article about "image processing" earlier, but since the BlockingQueueAgent took a maxlength as parameter, I simply skipped it, since I dont know the number of files/folders in advance. But it sounds like there is a workaround for that too? –  ebb Aug 9 '11 at 13:54
    
@ebb - The maxLength argument can be set to Int32.MaxValue - but you probably don't want to do that in practice. It just says that when the number of items reaches the maximal count, the queue will block the workflow that keeps adding items to the queue (until some more items are handled). This is used to avoid overfilling the queue when the whole pipeline cannot handle data fast enough. –  Tomas Petricek Aug 9 '11 at 14:17
    
@ebb - ... in your sample with file processing, you probably wouldn't want to create a queue with all files on a disk. Instead, you want to queue some number of files (e.g. 100) and process these from the queue, while the other process keeps adding files to the queue when the count is below 100. –  Tomas Petricek Aug 9 '11 at 14:18
    
Ah yea, the pending queue. In your displayPipelinedImages function at tomasp.net/blog/parallel-extra-image-pipeline.aspx - You have while true do... - How will that function ever could run as sync? –  ebb Aug 9 '11 at 15:58
    
Also please take a look at the printFiles() function in my update, if you dont mind. I'm not sure whether it's the "best" way to figure out when theres no more files in the files BlockingQueueAgent... –  ebb Aug 9 '11 at 16:21
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