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I'm looking for a quick and easy way to convert his XML (which is like XHTML) with XSLT 1.0:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<html>
  <head/>
  <body>
    <div>Hello<a href="http://google.com">this is the first</a>line.<p>This the second.<br/>And this the third one.</p></div>
  </body>
 </html>

to this one:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<html>
  <head/>
  <body>
    <div>
        <p>Hello<a href="http://google.com">this is the first</a>line.</p>
        <p>This the second.</p>
        <p>And this the third one.</p>
    </div>
  </body>
 </html>

I was thinking of a tree-walk algorithm in XSLT 1.0. What is complicated are e.g. the enclosed <a>links. And also existing <p> should not be removed.

May somebody help me with this? Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
1  
Here there is an identical question. Unfortunately is XSLT 2.0. My answer was close to XSLT 1.0 even if the use of xsl:for-each-group makes the answer XSLT 2.0. –  empo Aug 9 '11 at 13:04
    
You will need also a node-set() function to make possible a multi-pass transformation. –  empo Aug 9 '11 at 13:06
1  
Good question, +1. See my answer for a complete XSLT 1.0 solution -- no extension functions are necessary. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 9 '11 at 13:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="xml" omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes" />
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="div[text() and p]">
  <div>
   <p>
     <xsl:apply-templates select="node()[not(self::p or preceding-sibling::p)]"/>
   </p>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="p | p/following-sibling::node()"/>
  </div>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="p[text() and br]">
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match=
  "p/text()
    [preceding-sibling::node()[1][self::br]
    or
     following-sibling::node()[1][self::br]
    ]">
  <p><xsl:value-of select="."/></p>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="p/br"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<html>
    <head/>
    <body>
        <div>Hello
            <a href="http://google.com">this is the first</a>line.
            <p>This the second.<br/>And this the third one.</p>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<html>
   <head/>
   <body>
      <div>
         <p>Hello
            <a href="http://google.com">this is the first</a>line.
            </p>
         <p>This the second.</p>
         <p>And this the third one.</p>
      </div>
   </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This is amazing, even if OP should better clarify whether p should be created for each br or sentence or point? In the latter case (point) this is not going to work. –  empo Aug 9 '11 at 13:35
    
@empo: what is "point"? –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 9 '11 at 14:31
    
Sorry, read "dot". –  empo Aug 9 '11 at 14:34
1  
WOW! This really is amazing!! <p> should be created only for each br. Dot does not matter. Just curious: @Dimitre and @empo How did you learned to be so perfect in XSLT? Are you mathematician? Thank you so much!!! I learned alot of XSLT from you both! :-) –  therealmarv Aug 9 '11 at 14:37
1  
@therealmarv: You are welcome. I happen to have mathematical education and I think it generally helps for a programmer to be also a mathematician. As for my knowledge of XSLT, it has accumulated for the last 10 years. If you like such stuff, do have a look at my blog and read the FXSL papers at the "Extreme Markup Languages" conference -- links contained in my profile. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 9 '11 at 16:10

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