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I am new to iphone development and just in learning phase. I am learning from books and Video lectures while I saw this code Which I am unable to understand

- (IBAction)logoff:(id)sender {
//some code here 

}

here I do not understand that is id a data type or some entity. and what could be the reason to pass id as argument.

and at anohter place I saw

if(self)
{
// some code
}

I do not understand why he pass self in if. what the reason to check self. Should we check self before any time we use it.

Please it would be more helpful for me if you tell the reason that why he use this so that I could you it in my codes efficiently and reasonably.

thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
- (IBAction)logoff:(id)sender {
    //some code here 
}

Lots of controls (UIButton, UISwitch, UIBarButtonItem) can be connected to the same action method. Because the sender is of type id it will accept lots of different sender types, i.e. the sender type isn't restricted to only a UIButton.

Maulik's remark that the argument represents the tag is wrong, it represents the object (e.g. a UIControl) that sent the message. The object can be typecasted though in order to retrieve the tag, provided the type to which the sender is casted to contains the tag property and the sender is of the correct type.

Now about your other question: self is checked to be not nil before proceeding. Sometimes initialization can fail for several reasons (e.g. memory issues). If the object failed to initialize properly there's not much you can do with it (no access to ivars for example, since no memory was allocated for the ivars).

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if the sender of type is UIButton you can use UIButton button = (UIButton)sender; to get the actual button object..Consider id like a generic reference, like a void* in C... –  Krishnabhadra Aug 9 '11 at 12:13
    
@Krishnabhadra Don't forget UIButton is a class so will need to be a pointer ;) You'll need the asterixes : UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender; (Or is it markdown being funny - if you need asterixes inside your bolded text you can use double underscore to mark it instead of a asterixes) –  deanWombourne Aug 9 '11 at 12:51
    
oops...you are right...Forget asterics while trying to format..Thanks for noting that... –  Krishnabhadra Aug 10 '11 at 3:37

He doesn't, he evaluates self to check if it is nil.

Meaning if self is not nil do // some code

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it is obvious that he is checking self for nil but what could be the reason? –  Azhar Aug 9 '11 at 11:35
    
Maybe initialization / allocation failed, or maybe it was released for some reason.... –  MByD Aug 9 '11 at 11:36
- (IBAction)logoff:(id)sender {
//some code here 

}

the above code is for a button click.A button(logoff) that is putted via IB.When your click that button, method is associate with that button and will get called. (id)sender is an argument that represent the button's tag property.This is useful in case where you have more then one button and you want to handle the click events of those buttons.

if(self)
{
// some code
}

The above code checks weather memory allocation is done properly or not.

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This means that logoff contains id as the argument to function.. now in if condition it checks that the control still exists or not... It happens that you may just release the control or just get released by itself due to your logics... So we need this to check that control still exists..

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