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I'd like to know if there is a shorter / simpler way to:

  1. Split the incoming string by words
  2. Write the tokens in reverse order to stdout

There are two restrictions: no libraries and no loops

#include <string>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <sstream>
#include <deque>

void list_string_elements(std::string s) {
    using namespace std;

    istringstream iss (s);
    deque<string> v;

    copy(istream_iterator<string>(iss), istream_iterator<string>(), front_inserter(v));

    copy(v.begin(),v.end(),ostream_iterator<string>(cout,"\n"));
}
share|improve this question
7  
Looks nice to me... –  Armen Tsirunyan Aug 9 '11 at 12:45
3  
@Armen: well, in Python it would be print '\n'.join(reversed(s.split())), but yeah, it's nice for C++ ;-) –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '11 at 12:51
1  
Why is there a requirement for no loops? Just curious. –  Hunter McMillen Aug 9 '11 at 12:55
3  
@cimnine: great to see there are real C++ teachers in the wild and not just "C with classes" teachers. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 13:11
1  
@cimnine: He is in the committee? What is his name? –  Nawaz Aug 9 '11 at 13:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Slight abbreviation, we can get rid of a copy thanks to the iterator constructor of deque:

void list_string_elements(std::string s) {
    using namespace std;

    istringstream iss (s);
    deque<string> v(istream_iterator<string>(iss), (istream_iterator<string>()));
    copy(v.rbegin(),v.rend(),ostream_iterator<string>(cout,"\n"));
}

Note the extra parens around istream_iterator<string>(), to avoid a most vexing parse.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't you even put the stream declaration into the deque declaration? –  Christian Rau Aug 9 '11 at 13:01
    
Good one, thank you. –  cimnine Aug 9 '11 at 13:04
    
@Christian: yes you can, just replace iss with istringstream(s), but it would go off the RHS of SO's code window. Funny how obsolete restrictions on coding style can come back into fashion ;-) With a suitable range-like class and matching copy function you could avoid naming v too, but that's either a lot of typing to set up the one-liner, or else it breaks the rules of the question by using Boost.Range. –  Steve Jessop Aug 9 '11 at 13:33

There is not, because you need to store the words until the last one is fetched. It is more complex to try to tokenize backwards.

Also you cannot use std::copy_backward because std::istream_iterator is not bidirectional (only input).

std::deque is perfect for this task. You could have also used vector + back_inserter, and copied from v.rbegin() to v.rend() into ostream_iterator.

Also, the logic of tokenizing the string is simplest expressed with istringstream.

Basically, this looks like one cannot do much better.

The only religious little thing is that I cannot stand using namespace, even at block scope.

My proposal, with same number of lines:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

void output_tokens(const std::string& str)
{
    typedef std::istream_iterator<std::string> in_iterator;
    typedef std::ostream_iterator<std::string> out_iterator;

    std::istringstream in(str);
    std::vector<std::string> buffer(in_iterator(in), (in_iterator()));
    std::copy(buffer.rbegin(), buffer.rend(), out_iterator(std::cout, "\n"));
}

Important edit: You need the extra pair of parentheses around in_iterator() to avoid the entire statement to be parsed as a function declaration. @Steve Jessop's answer has the same issue. See this erroneous sample to witness the hair-pulling error message that results from such confusion.

share|improve this answer
    
About the using namespace: To fill the method body was an exercise in an exam. The method frame was given, including the using namespace. But I agree with you. –  cimnine Aug 9 '11 at 12:59
3  
That is indeed religious (that is, firmly believed but based on absolutely nothing :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Aug 9 '11 at 13:00
    
@Armen: this can be debated, because every form of using namespace can have nasty effects. So it's more theologic than religious, ie. based on a book that has some undisputed authority :) –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 13:06
1  
@Alexandre: Having premarital sex can have very nasty effects as well. And you won't die if you refrain from it. But... :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Aug 9 '11 at 13:08
1  
@Steve: corrected (before your comment actually). I figured it out when I ran the code in ideone... Vexing, indeed. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 13:20

It's good that your teacher is encouraging use of proper C++ functionality, but for fun, I would contend that using copy is simply moving the loop further down the stack... I would contend that recursion is the real way of doing this without using an explicit loop, something like below...

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

typedef std::string::const_iterator iterator;

void print_reverse(iterator s, iterator i, iterator e)
{
  // last word
  if (i == e)
  {
    if (s != i)
      std::cout << std::string(s, i) << std::endl;
    return;
  }
  std::string word;
  if (*i == ' ')
  {
    // have word here
    word.assign(s, i);
    s = ++i;
  }
  else
    ++i;
  // recursively call   
  print_reverse(s, i, e);

  if (!word.empty())
    std::cout << word << std::endl;
}

int main(void)
{
  std::string foo ("foo bar bof bob");
  print_reverse(foo.begin(), foo.begin(), foo.end());
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know how to feel about this. This has obvious problems (the first being that it isn't tail recursive, and thus will unneccessarily fail on long strings, the second being that the signature of the function isn't descriptive). On the other hand, it seems correct, but very verbose. The answers presented so far have the obvious advantage that they have production quality stardards. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 14:00
    
@Alexandre, it's not meant for any production use, simply being pedantic about loops... Tbh, in production quality code you're unlikely to have such artificial constraints. It's purely for demonstration of concept... –  Nim Aug 9 '11 at 19:36
    
abstracting away the loops in favor of named "algorithms" makes code more readable and thus more easily maintainable. Those constraints are not at all artificial in modern C++. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 19:39

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