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Consider an instance of a class:

class Car(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.engine = None

And a function that modifies that instance:

def add_engine(car):
    car.engine = 'V6'

Python has no implicit techniques of pointing out that an argument will be modified. The best solution that I could think of is to return the modified object (even though it will be the same object passed as an argument):

def add_engine(car):
    car.engine = 'V6'
    return car

How would you solve this design issue?

--

Guys, thank you very much for answering. Your advices helped to clear the mess in my head :)

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I tend to make these things methods that return self. That allows constructs like

car = Car().add_engine().add_wheels()

The other option, which is sometimes used in the Python standard library, is not to return anything. That's supposed to prevent confusion and force an imperative style on the client when they use destructive updates. list.sort vs. sorted is an example of this.

The choice is one of style, so the usual rules of consistency with surrounding code apply.

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Downvoters, care to explain? –  larsmans Aug 9 '11 at 13:50
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FWIW, I've noticed that in the Python universe, functions/methods that have side effects (such as the one you're asking about) always return None. (This is done implicitly, either by using a return statement without arguments, or simply leaving out the return altogether.)

For example compare the sorted built-in function, which returns a new list (sorted, of course), with the list.sort method, which returns None, because in this case the list is sorted in place. A similar situation applies in the case of the reversed built-in function and the list.reverse method.

Therefore, IMO, just having your function (implicitly) return None would be enough to alert users to the fact that the function has side effects (since, without side-effects, a function that always returned None would be basically a no-op) in a conventionally "Pythonic" way.

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+1 but I'm out of votes. This is useful way to give the same answer as @CatPlusPlus. This is absolutely what Python methods that have side effects / operate in place do. –  agf Aug 9 '11 at 13:34
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I would solve it completely differently:

class Car(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.engine = None

    def set_engine(self):
        self.engine = 'V6'

The convention is that add appends data; set alters existing state. The return of the car, as @larsmans points out, makes for attractive constructs, but it does not address your problem much at all.

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Python is not like C++, Java, C# etc. You can do pretty much anything you like to anything. You can't make anything private. You can't enforce const-ness.

There are benefits and downsides to these aspects of Python, but it is the way it is. Because so little can be checked statically, you need to very strong runtime tests for your code, with excellent coverage. Without strong tests that have complete coverage, development in Python can become a little like herding cats.

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You could override the attribute assigning with __setattr__ method:

class Car(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.engine = None
    def car_modified(self, name):
        #do whatever you want
    def __setattr__(self, name, value)
        self.__dict__[name] = value
        self.car_modified(name)

Now car_modified will be called every time you set an attribute.

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How does this answer the question of returning the original value vs. not returning a value? –  larsmans Aug 9 '11 at 13:16
    
@larsmans, "Python has no implicit techniques of pointing out that an argument will be modified.". You can get notified when a attribute assigned. I think it's part of the question. –  utdemir Aug 9 '11 at 13:20
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