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I have two classes test1 and test2:

struct test1
{
   int r;

   test1() {}
   test1(int value) : r(value) {}

   test1 foo() const;
};

struct test2
{
   int r;

   test2() {}
   test2(int value) : r(value) {}
};

template <typename t>
struct data_t
{
   static const t one;
};

template <> const test1 data_t<test1>::one  = test1(1);
template <> const test2 data_t<test2>::one  = test2(1);

then i created a function to do somthing:

template <typename t, const t& value>
t do_somthing()
{ return value; };

the action of do_something is straightforward, it returns a copy of value, so in main function:

int main()
{
   test1 r = do_somthing<test1, data_t<test1>::one>();
}

the problem happens when implementing test1::foo

test1 test1::foo() const
{ return do_somthing<test1, *this>(); }

the compiler stops with error: 'this' : can only be referenced inside non-static member functions

with *this it becomes test1 const& which acceptable as 2nd parameter, so why this error?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you call a template method with explicit mention of parameters like,

do_somthing<test1, data_t<test1>::one>(); //(1) ok
do_somthing<test1, *this>();  // (2) error

then compiler expects that the explicit arguments should be compile time constants. In your (2)nd case, *this is not resolvable to a compile time constant, so you are getting the compiler error.

Change the definition to below:

template <typename t>
t do_somthing(const t& value)
{ return value; };

and now when you call as,

do_somthing<test1>(*this);  // (2) ok

it should work. Because, now const t& doesn't need to be a compile time constant, even though it's resolved at compile time.

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The compiler tells you exactly why this won't work, 'this' : can only be referenced inside non-static member functions. It's not usable in any other context.

If you want to templatize this function in this manner you have to use a template function that has the ability to deduce the argument type at compile time, like this:

template <class T>
T copy_value(const T& value)
{
    return value;
}

class A
{
public:
    A clone()
    {
        return copy_value(*this);
    }
};

int main()
{
    int x = 999;
    int y = copy_value(x);

    double d = 9.99;
    double e = copy_value(d);

    std::string s = "Test";
    std::string t = copy_value(s);

    return 0;
}

In each of the above examples, the function template is deduced at compile time so the compiler can properly generate the code necessary. Your classes that you use with this template should be appropriately copyable, and copy-constructable.

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