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I've found myself coding this type of thing a few times.

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
   if (Thing.WaitingFor())
   {
      break;
   }
   Thread.Sleep(sleep_time);
}
if(!Thing.WaitingFor())
{
   throw new ItDidntHappenException();
}

It just looks like bad code, is there a better way of doing this / is it a symptom of bad design?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 95 down vote accepted

A much better way to implement this pattern is to have your Thing object expose an event on which the consumer can wait. For example a ManualResetEvent or AutoResetEvent. This greatly simplifies your consumer code to be the following

if (!Thing.ManualResetEvent.WaitOne(sleep_time)) {
  throw new ItDidntHappen();
}

// It happened

The code on the Thing side is also not really any more complex.

public sealed class Thing {
  public readonly ManualResetEvent ManualResetEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

  private void TheAction() {
    ...
    // Done.  Signal the listeners
    ManualResetEvent.Set();
  }
}
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+1 thanks Jared - that handles the exception case of it not happening very neatly –  richard druce Aug 9 '11 at 14:02
    
I think you need to ! the if statement, otherwise it will throw an exception when it does happen. –  SwDevMan81 Aug 9 '11 at 14:12
    
@SwDevMan81 good catch, updated –  JaredPar Aug 9 '11 at 14:13
    
When would you use each? (Auto vs. Manual) –  Vinko Vrsalovic Aug 10 '11 at 8:31
    
Auto will always allow exactly one waiting thread through, since it is reset as soon as the first one is released. Manual allows any threads which are waiting through until it is manually reset. –  ForbesLindesay Aug 10 '11 at 10:44
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Use events.

Have the thing you are waiting for raise an event when it's finished (or failed to finish within the allotted time) and then handle the event in your main application.

That way you don't have any Sleep loops.

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Events are godsend. –  canon Aug 9 '11 at 14:01
    
+1 Thanks Chris, how do you cater for events not happening within a certain time (which I care about in these instances). In my head I'd still be using sleeps. –  richard druce Aug 9 '11 at 14:04
    
@Richard - See JaredPar's answer –  ChrisF Aug 9 '11 at 14:06
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A loop is not a TERRIBLE way to wait for something, if there's nothing else for your program to do while it waits (for instance while connecting to a DB). However, I see some issues with yours.

    //It's not apparent why you wait exactly 10 times for this thing to happen
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        //A method, to me, indicates significant code behind the scenes.
        //Could this be a property instead, or maybe a shared reference?
        if (Thing.WaitingFor()) 
        {
            break;
        }
        //Sleeping wastes time; the operation could finish halfway through your sleep. 
        //Unless you need the program to pause for exactly a certain time, consider
        //Thread.Yield().
        //Also, adjusting the timeout requires considering how many times you'll loop.
        Thread.Sleep(sleep_time);
    }
    if(!Thing.WaitingFor())
    {
        throw new ItDidntHappenException();
    }

In short, the above code looks more like a "retry loop", that's been bastardized to work more like a timeout. Here's how I would structure a timeout loop:

var complete = false;
var startTime = DateTime.Now;
var timeout = new TimeSpan(0,0,30); //a thirty-second timeout.

//We'll loop as many times as we have to; how we exit this loop is dependent only
//on whether it finished within 30 seconds or not.
while(!complete && DateTime.Now < startTime.Add(timeout))
{
   //A property indicating status; properties should be simpler in function than methods.
   //this one could even be a field.
   if(Thing.WereWaitingOnIsComplete)
   {
      complete = true;
      break;
   }

   //Signals the OS to suspend this thread and run any others that require CPU time.
   //the OS controls when we return, which will likely be far sooner than your Sleep().
   Thread.Yield();
}
//Reduce dependence on Thing using our local.
if(!complete) throw new TimeoutException();
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thanks for pointing that out - a really good answer. –  richard druce Aug 9 '11 at 15:41
1  
Thread.Yield is interesting, although DateTime.Now is slower than DateTime.UtcNow and startTime.Add(timeout) is evaluated on every iteration. –  Steve Dunn Aug 9 '11 at 19:32
1  
Premature optimization is the root of all evil. You're right, of course, but adding a TimeSpan to a DateTime is not very expensive, and DateTime.Now only has to offset the hours. Overall, your optimizations won't have as much of an effect as getting rid of the Sleep. –  KeithS Aug 9 '11 at 19:38
    
Thread.Yield is a noop if the are no waiting threads ready to run –  David Heffernan Aug 9 '11 at 23:53
2  
-1: My goodness! Let's burn that CPU by putting it to loop like crazy! Look, when writing code that runs on the CLR, you should really try to think on a higher level. This is not assembly, and uyou are not coding a PIC! –  Bruno Reis Aug 12 '11 at 9:47
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If possible, have the asynchronous processing wrapped in a Task<T>. This provides the best of all worlds:

  • You can respond to the completion in an event-like way by using task continuations.
  • You can wait using the completion's waitable handle because Task<T> implements IAsyncResult.
  • Tasks are easily composable using the Async CTP; they also play well with Rx.
  • Tasks have a very clean built-in exception handling system (in particular, they correctly preserve the stack trace).

If you need to use a timeout, then Rx or the Async CTP can provide that.

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Should anyone really use the Async CTP in production? I realize that it will be a close to the final product, but it is still CTP. –  VoodooChild Aug 9 '11 at 20:52
    
It's your choice; I certainly am. If you prefer, you can easily compose Tasks with Rx, too. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 9 '11 at 20:54
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I would take a look at the WaitHandle class. Specifically the ManualResetEvent class that waits until the object is set. You can also specify timeout values for it and check if it was set afterward.

// Member variable
ManualResetEvent manual = new ManualResetEvent(false); // Not set

// Where you want to wait.
manual.WaitOne(); // Wait for manual.Set() to be called to continue here
if(!manual.WaitOne(0)) // Check if set
{
   throw new ItDidntHappenException();
}
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A call to Thread.Sleep always is an active wait which should be avoided.
One alternative would be to use a timer. For easier usage, you could encapsulate that into a class.

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Thanks Daniel, I didn't know that –  richard druce Aug 9 '11 at 14:06
    
Thread.Sleep always gets a bad wrap which makes me wonder, when is an actual good time to use Thread.Sleep? –  CheckRaise Aug 10 '11 at 17:57
2  
@CheckRaise: use it when you want to wait for a defined amount of time, and not for a condition. –  Bruno Reis Aug 12 '11 at 9:54
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I usually discourage throwing exceptions.

// Inside a method...
checks=0;
while(!Thing.WaitingFor() && ++checks<10) {
    Thread.Sleep(sleep_time);
}
return checks<10; //False = We didn't find it, true = we did
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@lshpeck - is there a reason for not throwing exceptions here? It's something I'd expect to be happening if the sister service is running –  richard druce Aug 9 '11 at 14:05
    
What sister service? –  Ishpeck Aug 9 '11 at 14:10
    
The actual code is checking that another service is performing a piece of work. If the service isn't on, it will fail so the exception is thrown and caught further up the stack. –  richard druce Aug 9 '11 at 14:12
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I think you should use AutoResetEvents. They work great when you are waiting for another thread to finish it's task

Example:

AutoResetEvent hasItem;
AutoResetEvent doneWithItem;
int jobitem;

public void ThreadOne()
{
 int i;
 while(true)
  {
  //SomeLongJob
  i++;
  jobitem = i;
  hasItem.Set();
  doneWithItem.WaitOne();
  }
}

public void ThreadTwo()
{
 while(true)
 {
  hasItem.WaitOne();
  ProcessItem(jobitem);
  doneWithItem.Set();

 }
}
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Here is how you can do it with System.Threading.Tasks:

Task t = Task.Factory.StartNew(
    () =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    });
if (t.Wait(500))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Success.");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Timeout.");
}

But if you can't use Tasks for some reason (like a requirement of .Net 2.0) then you can use ManualResetEvent as mentioned in JaredPar's answer or use something like this:

public class RunHelper
{
    private readonly object _gate = new object();
    private bool _finished;
    public RunHelper(Action action)
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
            s =>
            {
                action();
                lock (_gate)
                {
                    _finished = true;
                    Monitor.Pulse(_gate);
                }
            });
    }

    public bool Wait(int milliseconds)
    {
        lock (_gate)
        {
            if (_finished)
            {
                return true;
            }

            return Monitor.Wait(_gate, milliseconds);
        }
    }
}

With the Wait/Pulse approach you don't explicitly create Events so you don't need to care about disposing them.

Usage example:

var rh = new RunHelper(
    () =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    });
if (rh.Wait(500))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Success.");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Timeout.");
}
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