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Consider the following jasmine spec:

describe("something.act()", function() {
  it("calls some function of my module", function() {
    var mod = require('my_module');
    spyOn(mod, "someFunction");
    something.act();
    expect(mod.someFunction).toHaveBeenCalled();
  });
});

This is working perfectly fine. Something like this makes it green:

something.act = function() { require('my_module').someFunction(); };

Now have a look at this one:

describe("something.act()", function() {
  it("calls the 'root' function of my module", function() {
    var mod = require('my_module');
    spyOn(mod); // jasmine needs a property name
                // pointing to a function as param #2
                // therefore, this call is not correct.
    something.act();
    expect(mod).toHaveBeenCalled(); // mod should be a spy
  });
});

This is the code I'd like to test with this spec:

something.act = function() { require('my_module')(); };

This has bogged me down several times in the last few months. One theoretical solution would be to replace require() and return a spy created with createSpy(). BUT require() is an unstoppable beast: it is a different "copy" of the function in each and every source file/module. Stubbing it in the spec won't replace the real require() function in the "testee" source file.

An alternative is to add some fake modules to the load path, but it looks too complicated to me.

Any idea?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like I found an acceptable solution.

The spec helper:

var moduleSpies = {};
var originalJsLoader = require.extensions['.js'];

spyOnModule = function spyOnModule(module) {
  var path          = require.resolve(module);
  var spy           = createSpy("spy on module \"" + module + "\"");
  moduleSpies[path] = spy;
  delete require.cache[path];
  return spy;
};

require.extensions['.js'] = function (obj, path) {
  if (moduleSpies[path])
    obj.exports = moduleSpies[path];
  else
    return originalJsLoader(obj, path);
}

afterEach(function() {
  for (var path in moduleSpies) {
    delete moduleSpies[path];
  }
});

The spec:

describe("something.act()", function() {
  it("calls the 'root' function of my module", function() {
    var mod = spyOnModule('my_module');
    something.act();
    expect(mod).toHaveBeenCalled(); // mod is a spy
  });
});

This is not perfect but does the job quite well. It does not even mess with the testee source code, which is kind of a criterion for me.

share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly for one spec, but when I try to run two specs that both individually stub the same module, the first stub is always returned for both specs. It's being cached somewhere, but I can't figure out where. The delete moduleSpies[path] isn't good enough, it seems. –  EndangeredMassa Jun 16 '12 at 21:09
    
Could you try with delete require.cache[path]; after delete moduleSpies[path];? –  jbpros Jun 20 '12 at 14:41

This was very helpful, but it doesn't support calling through via .andCallThrough().

I was able to adapt it though, so I thought I'd share:

function clone(obj) {
  if (obj === null || typeof obj !== 'object') {
    return obj;
  }
  var key;
  var temp = new obj.constructor();
  for (key in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      temp[key] = clone(obj[key]);
    }
  }
  return temp;
};

spyOnModule = function spyOnModule(name) {
  var path          = require.resolve(name);
  var spy           = createSpy("spy on module \"" + name + "\"");
  moduleSpies[path] = spy;

  // Fake calling through
  spy.andCallThrough = function() {

    // Create a module object
    var mod = clone(module);
    mod.parent = module;
    mod.id = path;
    mod.filename = path;

    // Load it backdoor
    originalJsLoader(mod, path);

    // And set it's export as a faked call
    return this.andCallFake(mod.exports);
  }

  delete require.cache[path];
  return spy;
};
share|improve this answer

I needed to do this today and came across this post. My solution follows:

In a spec helper:

var originalRequire = require;
var requireOverrides = {};

stubModule = function(name) {
  var double = originalRequire(name);
  double['double'] = name;
  requireOverrides[name] = double;
  return double;
}

require = function(name) {
  if (requireOverrides[name]) {
    return requireOverrides[name];
  } else {
    return originalRequire(name);
  }
}

afterEach(function() {
  requireOverrides = {};
});

In a spec:

AWS = stubModule('aws-sdk');
spyOn(AWS.S3, 'Client');

// do something

expect(AWS.S3.Client).toHaveBeenCalled();
share|improve this answer

rewire is awesome for this

var rewire = require('rewire');

describe("something.act()", function() {
  it("calls the 'root' function of my module", function() {
    var mod = rewire('my_module');
    var mockRootFunction = jasmine.createSpy('mockRootFunction');
    var requireSpy = {
      mockRequire: function() {
        return mockRootFunction;
      }
    };
    spyOn(requireSpy, 'mockRequire').andCallThrough();

    origRequire = mod.__get__('require');
    mod.__set__('require', requireSpy.mockRequire);

    something.act();
    expect(requireSpy.mockRequire).toHaveBeenCalledWith('my_module');
    expect(mockRootFunction).toHaveBeenCalled();

    mod.__set__('require', origRequire);
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks for this. I wasn't aware of rewire. What a great solution to this issue. –  Terrence Jul 22 at 0:43

You can use gently module (https://github.com/felixge/node-gently). Hijacking require is mentioned in examples, and dirty NPM module actively uses it, so I suppose it works.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the tip! I went through the examples and I'm not so found of it. Actualy, it is just the same approach I initially took; it replaces require() right in the source file: if (global.GENTLY) require = GENTLY.hijack(require);. –  jbpros Aug 12 '11 at 7:58

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