Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found that STL is so heavy to use, such as vector, string, etc,. As a compiler project, speed and memory are both mattered. So, if I take string as its core data structure, it hard to improve translate speed.

I wander what's your solution to handle strings in your project?

thanks !

share|improve this question
4  
What do you find heavy in STL? –  quant_dev Aug 9 '11 at 14:48
    
How did you measure STL as "so heavy"? It provides a lot of useful features in a manner that to properly do the equivalent the code you write will likely be equally "heavy". To sum up, the solution to handle strings in my project is std::string. –  Chad Aug 9 '11 at 14:48
    
For an example, there are many name looking up in my project, such as "com.google.voice....", if I use std::string, it must be sliced again and again. First, head node "com" is sliced, if "com" object has been found, the other names "google.voice...." should be look up in this object recursively. Are there any better solution to avoid slice string repeatedly? –  Jerrfey Aug 9 '11 at 14:56
1  
@Jerrfey: that's not STL, but strings in general. If you store one string when you need three different substrings, it's going to be inefficient, regardless of which string class you use. –  jalf Aug 9 '11 at 15:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd recommend to look into custom allocators for STL if you run into any memory/performance issues (which is not likely to happen in the first place as DeadMG mentioned). I personally use STL with custom memory allocators that again use my own memory manager (so that i can keep track of the memory used by the stl containers/strings i use). So if memory usage/fragmentation is your concern I'd recommend to look into providing custom allocators for your stl code.

This was a great resource to get me started with custom memory allocation for STL: http://www.codeguru.com/cpp/cpp/cpp_mfc/stl/article.php/c4079

I also remember that ogre3D has some custom allocators for the STL containers which could be a great example to get you started!

share|improve this answer

Used correctly, the STL is generally zero overhead. It is as efficient as hand-rolled C code, so there's little reason to avoid it for performance reasons.

However, if you need functionality that doesn't exist in the STL, then yes, you'll probably be better off writing your own, than trying to force an STL class into doing something it wasn't meant for.

there are many name looking up in my project, such as "com.google.voice....", if I use std::string, it must be sliced again and again. First, head node "com" is sliced, if "com" object has been found, the other names "google.voice...." should be look up in this object recursively. Are there any better solution to avoid slice string repeatedly?

I would use iterators.

Say you have a string s = "com.google.voice", then simply define iterators pointing at the beginning of the string, and at the separator between each substring. Then instead of creating a completely new string to represent "com", you simply use the two iterators pointing at the start and the end of the string.

Boost.StringAlgo contains a lot of common string operations implemented to work on iterator ranges.

share|improve this answer

Yes, there are things to be gained when doing things yourself.
However, there are things to be considered:

  • Do you know enough about why your solution would be better than a standard solution?
  • Do you know enough about your platform to take advantage?
  • Do you want to spend the time to make better solutions?
  • Do you want to take the risk (debugging, no support,...)?
  • How would you know what you have gained/lost?

Good luck.

share|improve this answer

You won't find a faster solution to an equivalent algorithm. Beyond improving your use of string items like reserve(), correctly swapping instead of copying, and such, you will not gain any significant speedup, unless you have an STL that's a decade old or something.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.