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This is more a question of elegance and performance rather than “how to do at all”, so I'll just show the code:

def iterate_adjacencies(gen, fill=0, size=2, do_fill_left=True,
  do_fill_right=False):
    """ Iterates over a 'window' of `size` adjacent elements in the supploed
    `gen` generator, using `fill` to fill edge if `do_fill_left` is True
    (default), and fill the right edge (i.e.  last element and `size-1` of
    `fill` elements as the last item) if `do_fill_right` is True.  """
    fill_size = size - 1
    prev = [fill] * fill_size
    i = 1
    for item in gen:  # iterate over the supplied `whatever`.
        if not do_fill_left and i < size:
            i += 1
        else:
            yield prev + [item]
        prev = prev[1:] + [item]
    if do_fill_right:
        for i in range(fill_size):
            yield prev + [fill]
            prev = prev[1:] + [fill]

and then ask: is there already a function for that? And, if not, can you do the same thing in a better (i.e. more neat and/or more fast) way?

Edit:

with ideas from answers of @agf, @FogleBird, @senderle, a resulting somewhat-neat-looking piece of code is:

def window(seq, size=2, fill=0, fill_left=True, fill_right=False):
    """ Returns a sliding window (of width n) over data from the iterable:
      s -> (s0,s1,...s[n-1]), (s1,s2,...,sn), ...
    """
    ssize = size - 1
    it = chain(
      repeat(fill, ssize * fill_left),
      iter(seq),
      repeat(fill, ssize * fill_right))
    result = tuple(islice(it, size))
    if len(result) == size:  # `<=` if okay to return seq if len(seq) < size
        yield result
    for elem in it:
        result = result[1:] + (elem,)
        yield result
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1  
You might want to explain in more detail what this does with words. –  agf Aug 9 '11 at 14:59
2  
Could you provide a sample input and a samplle of the expected output please? it would be easier to understand what your function is doing. –  MatToufoutu Aug 9 '11 at 15:03
2  
It was faster for me to run the code and see than figure it out from the docstring because the wording wasn't that clear, so I suggested he write it out more clearly. –  agf Aug 9 '11 at 15:48
1  
@HoverHell - Very, very nice. You should post it as an answer and accept it. How would I phrase the docstring differently? I would break it up into several short declarative sentences describing what it does and each argument. –  agf Aug 10 '11 at 18:57
1  
@HoverHell: 1) Yes, do post your new code as an answer. 2) This question and its answer explain how to create a rolling window in numpy. –  senderle Aug 10 '11 at 22:13

5 Answers 5

This page shows how to implement a sliding window with itertools. http://docs.python.org/release/2.3.5/lib/itertools-example.html

def window(seq, n=2):
    "Returns a sliding window (of width n) over data from the iterable"
    "   s -> (s0,s1,...s[n-1]), (s1,s2,...,sn), ...                   "
    it = iter(seq)
    result = tuple(islice(it, n))
    if len(result) == n:
        yield result    
    for elem in it:
        result = result[1:] + (elem,)
        yield result

Example output:

>>> list(window(range(10)))
[(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5), (5, 6), (6, 7), (7, 8), (8, 9)]

You'd need to change it to fill left and right if you need.

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This is my version that fills, keeping the signature the same. I have previously seen the itertools recipe, but did not look at it before writing this.

from itertools import chain
from collections import deque

def ia(gen, fill=0, size=2, fill_left=True, fill_right=False):
    gen, ssize = iter(gen), size - 1
    deq = deque(chain([fill] * ssize * fill_left,
                      (next(gen) for _ in xrange((not fill_left) * ssize))),
                maxlen = size)
    for item in chain(gen, [fill] * ssize * fill_right):
        deq.append(item)
        yield deq

Edit: I also didn't see your comments on your question before posting this.

Edit 2: Fixed. I had tried to do it with one chain but this design needs two.

Edit 3: As @senderle noted, only use it this as a generator, don't wrap it with list or accumulate the output, as it yields the same mutable item repeatedly.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't be better to return a tuple? The result of list(ia(range(10), 'a', fill_left=True, fill_right=True)) is a list of references to the same deque, all in the same state. Also, you could use islice to construct the deque and then iterate over the remainder of gen, instead of calling chain twice. –  senderle Aug 10 '11 at 3:31
    
That's just the solution given in itertools. I wasn't interested in replicating it. –  agf Aug 10 '11 at 18:52
    
It is? I don't see that in itertools anywhere. Let me rephrase. Repeatedly yielding the same mutable object generates unexpected results. For example, the output of list(ia(range(2), 'x', 2, True, True)) is [deque([1, 'x'], maxlen=2), deque([1, 'x'], maxlen=2), deque([1, 'x'], maxlen=2)]. I think it would make sense to return a copy of the deque's contents instead of just returning the deque. The fastest way to do that is probably with tuple. –  senderle Aug 10 '11 at 19:02
    
I understand. But if you're going to yield tuples and use islice anyway, then the solution given by @HoverHell based on the one in itertools with chain and repeat to fill is better. It's not worth adapting this one to be more like that; better to leave it for when you really want to use it just as a generator. –  agf Aug 10 '11 at 19:10
    
Yeah, ok, I see what you're saying now. And indeed, after doing some timings, I have to admit that you are totally correct on all points. –  senderle Aug 10 '11 at 22:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Resulting function (from the edit of the question),

frankeniter with ideas from answers of @agf, @FogleBird, @senderle, a resulting somewhat-neat-looking piece of code is:

from itertools import chain, repeat, islice

def window(seq, size=2, fill=0, fill_left=True, fill_right=False):
    """ Returns a sliding window (of width n) over data from the iterable:
      s -> (s0,s1,...s[n-1]), (s1,s2,...,sn), ...
    """
    ssize = size - 1
    it = chain(
      repeat(fill, ssize * fill_left),
      iter(seq),
      repeat(fill, ssize * fill_right))
    result = tuple(islice(it, size))
    if len(result) == size:  # `<=` if okay to return seq if len(seq) < size
        yield result
    for elem in it:
        result = result[1:] + (elem,)
        yield result

and, for some performance information regarding deque/tuple:

In [32]: kwa = dict(gen=xrange(1000), size=4, fill=-1, fill_left=True, fill_right=True)
In [33]: %timeit -n 10000 [a+b+c+d for a,b,c,d in tmpf5.ia(**kwa)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 358 us per loop
In [34]: %timeit -n 10000 [a+b+c+d for a,b,c,d in tmpf5.window(**kwa)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 368 us per loop
In [36]: %timeit -n 10000 [sum(x) for x in tmpf5.ia(**kwa)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 340 us per loop
In [37]: %timeit -n 10000 [sum(x) for x in tmpf5.window(**kwa)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 432 us per loop

but anyway, if it's numbers then numpy is likely preferable.

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Ok, after coming to my senses, here's a non-ridiculous version of window_iter_fill. My previous version (visible in edits) was terrible because I forgot to use izip. Not sure what I was thinking. Using izip, this works, and, in fact, is the fastest option for small inputs!

def window_iter_fill(gen, size=2, fill=None):
    gens = (chain(repeat(fill, size - i - 1), gen, repeat(fill, i))
            for i, gen in enumerate(tee(gen, size)))
    return izip(*gens)

This one is also fine for tuple-yielding, but not quite as fast.

def window_iter_deque(it, size=2, fill=None, fill_left=False, fill_right=False):
    lfill = repeat(fill, size - 1 if fill_left else 0)
    rfill = repeat(fill, size - 1 if fill_right else 0)
    it = chain(lfill, it, rfill)
    d = deque(islice(it, 0, size - 1), maxlen=size)
    for item in it:
        d.append(item)
        yield tuple(d)

HoverHell's newest solution is still the best tuple-yielding solution for high inputs.

Some timings:

Arguments: [xrange(1000), 5, 'x', True, True]

==============================================================================
  window               HoverHell's frankeniter           :  0.2670ms [1.91x]
  window_itertools     from old itertools docs           :  0.2811ms [2.02x]
  window_iter_fill     extended `pairwise` with izip     :  0.1394ms [1.00x]
  window_iter_deque    deque-based, copying              :  0.4910ms [3.52x]
  ia_with_copy         deque-based, copying v2           :  0.4892ms [3.51x]
  ia                   deque-based, no copy              :  0.2224ms [1.60x]
==============================================================================

Scaling behavior:

Arguments: [xrange(10000), 50, 'x', True, True]

==============================================================================
  window               HoverHell's frankeniter           :  9.4897ms [4.61x]
  window_itertools     from old itertools docs           :  9.4406ms [4.59x]
  window_iter_fill     extended `pairwise` with izip     :  11.5223ms [5.60x]
  window_iter_deque    deque-based, copying              :  12.7657ms [6.21x]
  ia_with_copy         deque-based, copying v2           :  13.0213ms [6.33x]
  ia                   deque-based, no copy              :  2.0566ms [1.00x]
==============================================================================

The deque-yielding solution by agf is super fast for large inputs -- seemingly O(n) instead of O(n, m) like the others, where n is the length of the iter and m is the size of the window -- because it doesn't have to iterate over every window. But I still think it makes more sense to yield a tuple in the general case, because the calling function is probably just going to iterate over the deque anyway; it's just a shift of the computational burden. The asymptotic behavior of the larger program should remain the same.

Still, in some special cases, the deque-yielding version will probably be faster.

Some more timings based on HoverHell's test structure.

>>> import testmodule
>>> kwa = dict(gen=xrange(1000), size=4, fill=-1, fill_left=True, fill_right=True)
>>> %timeit -n 1000 [a + b + c + d for a, b, c, d in testmodule.window(**kwa)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 462 us per loop
>>> %timeit -n 1000 [a + b + c + d for a, b, c, d in testmodule.ia(**kwa)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 463 us per loop
>>> %timeit -n 1000 [a + b + c + d for a, b, c, d in testmodule.window_iter_fill(**kwa)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 251 us per loop
>>> %timeit -n 1000 [sum(x) for x in testmodule.window(**kwa)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 525 us per loop
>>> %timeit -n 1000 [sum(x) for x in testmodule.ia(**kwa)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 462 us per loop
>>> %timeit -n 1000 [sum(x) for x in testmodule.window_iter_fill(**kwa)]
1000 loops, best of 3: 333 us per loop

Overall, once you use izip, window_iter_fill is quite fast, as it turns out -- especially for small windows.

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Iterating over a deque is faster than iterating over a tuple, though, so it makes sense to return a deque if you're going to iterate. Here's a recent answer in which I timed a few windowing iterators and considered the deque vs. tuple/list question. –  kindall Aug 10 '11 at 22:23
    
Funny that window_itertools is a little bit slower. Also, deque is faster if you're going to iterate, but tuple seems faster if you're unpacking. –  HoverHell Aug 11 '11 at 7:32
    
Er, actually tuple just seemed faster when unpacking - deque is approximately as fast in such case. See my answer for some timings. –  HoverHell Aug 11 '11 at 7:38
    
@kindall, moreover, you'll probably iterate over the values twice if you return a tuple. But I wasn't being clear -- my point was just that although the asymptotic behavior of ia looks better in the above timings (only ~10x instead of ~50x slower like all the rest) the asymptotic behavior of a program using it is likely to be no better. So you're really just getting a speedup by a constant factor. I don't think that's an unacceptable price to pay for a more general-use iterator. Certainly for special purposes, though, returning a deque is a good strategy. –  senderle Aug 11 '11 at 22:31
    
@kindall, @HoverHell, it seems I was being stupid! I forgot to use izip -- in fact, with izip, yielding tuples is automatic, and produces the fastest result (on my computer) for small inputs. –  senderle Aug 13 '11 at 19:51

I'm surprised nobody took a simple coroutine approach.

from collections import deque


def window(n, initial_data=None):
    if initial_data:
        win = deque(initial_data, n)
    else:
        win = deque(((yield) for _ in range(n)), n)
    while 1:
        side, val = (yield win)
        if side == 'left':
            win.appendleft(val)
        else:
            win.append(val)

win = window(4)
win.next()

print(win.send(('left', 1)))
print(win.send(('left', 2)))
print(win.send(('left', 3)))
print(win.send(('left', 4)))
print(win.send(('right', 5)))

## -- Results of print statements --
deque([1, None, None, None], maxlen=4)
deque([2, 1, None, None], maxlen=4)
deque([3, 2, 1, None], maxlen=4)
deque([4, 3, 2, 1], maxlen=4)
deque([3, 2, 1, 5], maxlen=4)
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