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I am using %in% for subsetting and I came across a strange result.

> my.data[my.data$V3 %in% seq(200,210,.01),]
        V1     V2        V3         V4       V5      V6         V7
56     470   48.7    209.73        yes     26.3      54        470

That was correct. But when I widen the range... row 56 just disappears

> my.data[my.data$V3 %in% seq(150,210,.01),]
        V1     V2        V3         V4       V5      V6         V7
51     458   48.7    156.19        yes     28.2      58        458
67     511   30.5    150.54        yes     26.1      86        511
73     535   40.6    178.76        yes     29.5      73        535

Can you tell me what's wrong? Is there a better way to subset the dataframe?

Here is its structure

> str(my.data)
'data.frame':   91 obs. of  7 variables:
 $ V1: Factor w/ 91 levels "100","10004",..: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
 $ V2: num  44.6 22.3 30.4 38.6 15.2 18.3 16.3 12.2 36.7 12.2 ...
 $ V3: num  110.83 25.03 17.17 57.23 2.18 ...
 $ V4: Factor w/ 2 levels "no","yes": 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
 $ V5: num  22.3 30.5 24.4 25.5 4.1 28.4 7.9 5.1 24 12.2 ...
 $ V6: int  50 137 80 66 27 155 48 42 65 100 ...
 $ V7: chr  "" "10004" "10005" "10012" ...
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Can you clarify if you are trying to return all rows where V3 is in a stated range or if you want to return only rows that are equal to the the sequence numbers you intended to be returned? –  Gavin Simpson Aug 9 '11 at 15:25
    
Given that V3 is rounded to 2 decimal digits, I thought that "all rows where V3 is in a stated range" is identical to "rows that are equal to a sequence of numbers with an increment of .01". To answer your question, I want the first –  Brani Aug 9 '11 at 16:00
    
V3 might be exact, I don't know all the values. The issue is that seq()'s values are not rounded, exact and that is the problem. Anyway, doing things by testing for exact equality is destined to fail on a computer using floating point arithmetic. It is far safer/easier/correct to use less than and greater than operators in R. See my Answer or the second option of the Answer by @nullglob (though ignore his first option as that is wrong). –  Gavin Simpson Aug 9 '11 at 16:04
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Ooops. You are trying to do exact matching on a computer that can't represent all numbers exactly.

> any(209.73 == seq(200,210,.01))
[1] TRUE
> any(209.73 == seq(150,210,.01))
[1] FALSE
> any(209.73 == zapsmall(seq(150,210,.01)))
[1] TRUE

The reason for the discrepancy is in the second sequence, the value in the sequence is not exactly 209.73. This is something you have to appreciate when doing computation with computers.

This is covered in many places on the interweb, but in relation to R, see point 7.31 in the R FAQ.

Anyway, that said, you are going about the problem incorrectly. You want to use proper numeric operators:

my.data[my.data$V3 >= 150 & my.data$V3 <= 210, ]
## or
subset(my.data, V3 >= 150 & V3 <= 210)
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