Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a situation where at one point the html contents of a div are changed to something else, and then are changed back. Some of jquery ui controls are misbehaving. I've reduced the problem to the following snippet, which basically shows that the event handler associated with the button doesn't fire anymore. I am assuming that these were garbage collected at some point when they were gone. So my question is -

How do I prevent event handlers from being garbage collected when they are missing from the DOM?

I understand that I could just reassign the click() function, but since I'm using an external library (jquery ui), i don't really know what's it doing with my controls. I'd just want their events restored as they were before.

<div id="container">
    <p>This container has a button, which will forget its click()...</p>
    <input id="testbutton" type="button" value="Click Me!"/>
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function(){ 
        $("#testbutton").click(
            function(){
                alert("Button has been clicked!");
        })
    });
</script>

<div>
    <p>... when this button reseats html</p>
    <input id="actionbutton" type="button" value="Toggle"/>
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    var toggle = false;
    var html;
    $(function(){ 
        $("#actionbutton").click(
            function(){
                toggle = !toggle;
                if(toggle){
                    html = $("#container").html();
                    $("#container").html("");
                } else  $("#container").html(html);
        })
    });
</script>

This jfiddle demonstrates the problem that I'm having.

share|improve this question
    
And alternative is to not overwrite the html in the container, but instead use the detach method to remove it and then add it back to the dom - jsfiddle.net/8S5E4/4. Doesn't seem like this is what you wanted though (based on the comments in the fiddle) –  Richard Dalton Aug 9 '11 at 15:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simple answer: use .live

$(function(){ 
    $("#testbutton").live('click',
        function(){
            alert("Button has been clicked!");
    })
});

Here's the updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/mrchief/8S5E4/1/

Explanation: When you alter the DOM, event handlers attached the element are also removed. Using .live attaches the event handlers to 'body' (and filters by DOM element) so that it 'lives' even after removing/adding the same DOM element.

You can achieve the same effect using .delegate also:

$(function(){ 
    $('#container').delegate('#testbutton', 'click',
        function(){
            alert("Button has been clicked!");
    })
});

fiddle using .delegate: http://jsfiddle.net/mrchief/8S5E4/6/

I would recommend using .delegate over .live for:

  • You can cancel event bubbling. When you use live, the event bubbles up all the way to body and then your handler gets called, so there is no way to cancel its bubbling. (As of jQuery 1.4, this can be prevented by using a context argument: http://api.jquery.com/live/)
  • Since you're attaching to a DOM element specifically, it doesn't get invoked everytime there is a click on any other DOM element on body and hence, is more performant as it has to do less work now.

Here's a great article that beautifully explains the differences between live, delegate and bind and discusses about the nuances of each approach. Thanks to @andyb for pointing this link out.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for a very comprehensive answer! I still have a problem though, because it's not really I who makes the click() events in the first place, it's jquery ui. What I'll do is post another question and present that particular issue there. –  Gleno Aug 9 '11 at 19:44
    
Glad to help! Don't forget to accept an answer! –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:48

jQuery event delegation to the rescue

$("#container").delegate('#testbutton', 'click',
    function(){
        alert("Button has been clicked!");
});

Note: .delegate() is more efficient than .live()

share|improve this answer
    
just out of interest: Is the efficiency-issue still the same? The article you posted is over a year old and was written in times of jquery 1.4. Has the jQuery - Team resolved this or should I start using delegate for these cases? –  GNi33 Aug 9 '11 at 15:38
    
As of 1.4, live takes a context argument too $("div.clickme", $("#container")[0]).live("click", function() { // Live handler called. }); : api.jquery.com/live –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 15:43
1  
@GNi33, see @Mrchief's answer for some more reasons why delegate is better, also a more recent article on the difference. That said, I agree that the linked article is old and that the jQuery team might have tightened up .live() since 1.4 –  andyb Aug 9 '11 at 16:00

This is happening because you're binding an event to #testbutton which lives inside of #container on document ready. When you clear the HTML of #container you're also losing that #testbutton bound click event. Rather, the element that the click event references no longer exists.

If you want that button event to persist try using live() binding or delegate() the event from a parent element.


Using live()

$(function(){ 
    $("#testbutton").live("click", function() {
        alert("Button has been clicked!");
    })
});

Attach a handler to the event for all elements which match the current selector, now and in the future.


Using delegate()

$(function(){ 
    $("#container").delegate("#testbutton", "click", function() {
        alert("Button has been clicked!");
    })
});

Attach a handler to one or more events for all elements that match the selector, now or in the future, based on a specific set of root elements.

share|improve this answer

Use the live() function instead of click

jsFiddle

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.