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Given the following:

case class Num(value: Double) {
  def plus(rhs: Num) = Num(value + rhs.value)
  def times(rhs: Num) = Num(value * rhs.value)
}

object TestApp extends App {
  // ** maybe do something here
  val one = Num(1)
  val two = Num(2)
  val three = Num(3)
  val result = three plus one times two
}

Is there a way to rename the plus method/function in Num to +plus and the times method to *times at runtime such that result = three +- one *- two?

It's very important that this happens at runtime. I'd like to avoid compiler plugins if possible. Also, I'm not against java examples, if applicable.

The reason I'd like to do this is because the default operator precedence in Scala for three plus one times two results in 8 while three +- one *- two results in 5.

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The result should never be 5. If you're using algebraic precedence, it's 6. –  Amir Afghani Aug 9 '11 at 17:32
    
My gut feeling is that the problem is not Scala's default order of predecence, and you don't need to rename the methods 'on the fly' to solve this problem. –  Amir Afghani Aug 9 '11 at 17:34
2  
@Amir Afghani, 3 + 1 * 2 = 5 by "normal" precedence rules, not sure where 6 came from. –  Garrett Rowe Aug 9 '11 at 18:40
3  
Although I've never dared venturing into the internals of the Scala compiler, I would be willing to bet an entire stock market that operator precedence is determined at compile time and not at run time. In other words, to your question: perhaps, but it won't help you. :) –  Knut Arne Vedaa Aug 9 '11 at 19:16
2  
If the renaming happened at runtime, then the code would not be compilable. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 9 '11 at 20:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're assuming operator precedence will work by naming things the way you want, and that's not gonna work. The quickest way I can think of to make this work is with a pimp, as @Dave Griffith suggested:

case class Num(value: Double)

object Main {
  implicit def toDouble(v: Num) = v.value
  implicit def toNum(v: Double) = Num(v)
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val one = Num(1)
    val two = Num(2)
    val three = Num(3)
    val result: Num = three + one * two
    println(result)
  }
}

What's more is that you can't do this at "runtime". How would you expect to make the call to a function whose name doesn't exist at compile time? i.e. Num.+plus where Num has no +plus method? The compiler is going to tell you to get lost. And, as was already stated, +plus isn't valid anyway.

EDIT: I was looking at this again today and I'm not sure what I was smoking. A much better Pimp is:

class NumMath(u: Num) {
  def +(v: Num) = Num(u.value + v.value)
  def *(v: Num) = Num(u.value * v.value)
}

object Num {
  implicit def toNumMath(v: Num) = new NumMath(v)
}
case class Num(value: Double)

object Main {
  import Num._
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val one = Num(1)
    val two = Num(2)
    val three = Num(3)
    val result = three + one * two
    println(result)
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't aggree with first sentence. The first operator character defines the precedence (See Scala spec. 6.12.3). Of course the operator identifier must be valid, and +add is not valid as you pointed out. But *--<< is valid and will have a higher precedence than --<<* –  paradigmatic Aug 10 '11 at 0:01
    
I stand corrected. :) Thanks for pointing it out. I really gotta read that spec someday soon. –  Derek Wyatt Aug 10 '11 at 9:47
    
Let's assume the operator identifiers are valid. How would we do this? –  mepcotterell Aug 17 '11 at 0:16
    
???? Why? Scala does this sort of thing with implicit conversions as I've shown above - * is much better than *times anyway. –  Derek Wyatt Aug 17 '11 at 10:59

+plus and *times aren't valid Scala names. Names that start with non-alphabetic characters (other than _ and $) must include only non-alphabetic characters.

Other than that, the semantics you want could be done easily with an implicit conversion.

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