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How can I use templates, to find out, from which types is type composed of when using template layers?

Let's have

template <typename Super>
class A : public Super {};

template <typename Super>
class B : public Super {};

template <typename Super>
class C : public Super {};

class Blank{};

template <typename CombinedType>
void printTypeComponents(const CombinedType & t) { ... }

int main()
{
     typedef A<B<C<Blank>>> ComposedType;
     ComposedType ct;
     printTypeComponents(ct);

     typedef A<C<Blank>> ComposedType2;
     ComposedType2 ct2;
     printTypeComponents(ct2);
}

I am attaching my try, wrong of course (works only if object is composed from all tested types, since tested types actually exists), but you can easily see from it, what my aim is

#include <boost/type_traits/is_base_of.hpp>
#include <iostream>

template <typename Super>
class A : public Super 
{
public:
    typedef A<Super> AComponent;
};

template <typename Super>
class B : public Super 
{
public:
    typedef B<Super> BComponent;
};

template <typename Super>
class C : public Super 
{
public:
    typedef C<Super> CComponent;
};

class Blank{};

template <typename CombinedType>
void printTypeComponents(const CombinedType & t)
{
    if(boost::is_base_of<Blank, CombinedType::AComponent>::value)
        std::cout << "composed of A \n";

    if(boost::is_base_of<Blank, CombinedType::BComponent>::value)
        std::cout << "composed of B \n";

    if(boost::is_base_of<Blank, CombinedType::CComponent>::value)
        std::cout << "composed of C \n";
}

int main()
{
     typedef A<B<C<Blank>>> ComposedType;
     ComposedType ct;
     printTypeComponents(ct);

     //typedef A<C<Blank>> ComposedType2;
     //ComposedType2 ct2;
     //printTypeComponents(ct2);
}

I am using MSVC2010

Thank you!

EDIT: I am not actually interested in names of types... I want to use it like:

if(composedOfA)
    doSomeCharacteristicStuffFromA(); //member function of A

if(composedOfB)
    doSomeCharacteristicStuffFromB(); //member function of B
share|improve this question
    
SFINAE can help here.. –  Nawaz Aug 9 '11 at 18:25
    
@relax - Or virtual functions... –  Bo Persson Aug 10 '11 at 15:37
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My attempt (without using C++0x feature(s))

//----------------------------------------

struct null{};

template<typename> 
struct split
{
   typedef null Ct;
   typedef null At;
};

template<template<typename> class C, typename T> 
struct split<C<T> >
{
   typedef C<null> Ct; //class template 
   typedef T      At;  //argument type
};

template<template<typename> class C> 
struct split<C<Blank> >
{
   typedef C<null> Ct; //class template 
   typedef Blank   At;  //argument type
};

template<typename T, typename U>
struct is_same
{
   static const bool value = false;
};
template<typename T>
struct is_same<T,T>
{
   static const bool value = true;
};

typedef  A<null> anull;
typedef  B<null> bnull;
typedef  C<null> cnull;

//----------------------------------------

template <typename CombinedType>
void printTypeComponents(const CombinedType & t)
{
     typedef typename split<CombinedType>::Ct Ct;
     typedef typename split<CombinedType>::At At;

     if ( is_same<Ct,anull>::value ) 
           cout << "A" << endl;
     else if ( is_same<Ct,bnull>::value )
           cout << "B" << endl;
     else if ( is_same<Ct,cnull>::value )
           cout << "C" << endl;

     if ( !is_same<At,Blank>::value )
           printTypeComponents(At());
     else
           cout << "Blank" << endl;
}

Test code:

int main()
{
     typedef A<B<C<Blank> > > ComposedType;
     ComposedType ct;
     printTypeComponents(ct);

     cout<<"-------"<<endl;

     typedef A<C<Blank> > ComposedType2;
     ComposedType2 ct2;
     printTypeComponents(ct2);
}

Output:

A
B
C
Blank
-------
A
C
Blank

Online Demo : http://ideone.com/T5nD4

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, but when when trying to compile it in VS2010 I am getting error C2872: is_same : ambiguous symbol. Since I am not very familiar with this kind of programming, I can not fix it by myself. Can you help me please? –  relaxxx Aug 9 '11 at 20:07
3  
@relaxxx: Remove using namespace std, or drop the custom is_same and use std::is_same from <type_traits> (also you can use std::is_base_of in your original post). This is why one should never write using namespace std by the way. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 20:19
    
@Alexandre thank you, it works... now I need some big moment to understand, what is going (and how) in split... then I will look and your and other answers –  relaxxx Aug 9 '11 at 20:42
    
guys, can you please take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/7013286/… –  relaxxx Aug 10 '11 at 15:19
add comment

Exploiting your structure, what about:

template <template <typename> class X, typename T>
void print_type(const X<T>& x, char (*)[std::is_base_of<T, X<T>>::value] = 0)
{
    std::cout << "Base: " << typeid(T).name() << "\n";
    print_type<T>(x);
}

template <typename T>
void print_type(const T&) {}
share|improve this answer
    
That edit is better, but you're only getting the first base. print_type should probably be recursive. –  Mooing Duck Aug 9 '11 at 18:32
    
@Mooing: granted. Getting a type list won't be easy since VS2010 doesn't have variadic templates. And typeid'ing a template isn't something you can do. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 18:37
    
doesn't print_type<base>(x); work? –  Mooing Duck Aug 9 '11 at 20:55
    
@Mooing: not quite. You have to use SFINAE to distinguish template parameters from template parameters which are base classes. I updated the code. –  Alexandre C. Aug 9 '11 at 21:17
    
@Alexandre thank you very much for your answer –  relaxxx Aug 10 '11 at 10:13
add comment

Here is a template unraveller that uses variadic typenames. You can probably make it work in VS2010 with the usual macro tricks (e.g. like in the pretty-printer.)

template <typename T> class A : public T {};
template <typename T> class B : public T {};
template <typename T> class C : public T {};

struct NullType {};


#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>

template <typename ...Args> struct Concat;

template <typename T, typename ...Args>
struct Concat<T, std::tuple<Args...>>
{
  typedef std::tuple<T, Args...> type;
};

template <typename> struct Unravel;

template <typename T, template <typename> class X>
struct Unravel<X<T>>
{
  typedef typename Concat<X<T>, typename Unravel<T>::type>::type type;
};

template <template <typename> class X>
struct Unravel<X<NullType>>
{
  typedef std::tuple<X<NullType>> type;
};

template <typename T> struct printArgs;

template <typename T, typename ...Args>
struct printArgs<std::tuple<T, Args...>>
{
  static void print() { std::cout << "Have type." << std::endl; printArgs<std::tuple<Args...>>::print(); }
};

template <typename T>
struct printArgs<std::tuple<T>>
{
  static void print() { std::cout << "Have type." << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
  typedef A<B<C<NullType>>> CType;
  printArgs<Unravel<CType>::type>::print();
}

It won't print anything exciting, so at the moment you just get one line per inheritance, but if you partially-specialize printArgs you can print specific information for your types.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your answer –  relaxxx Aug 10 '11 at 10:14
add comment

This might work for you (if I understood the question correctly). I got it working with gcc, but think it should work even in VS2010.

void printTypeComponents(const Blank&)
{
  std::cout << "composed of Blank\n";
}

template <typename T>
void printTypeComponents(const A<T>&)
{
  std::cout << "composed of A\n";
  printTypeComponents(T());
}

template <typename T>
void printTypeComponents(const B<T>&)
{
  std::cout << "composed of B\n";
  printTypeComponents(T());
}

template <typename T>
void printTypeComponents(const C<T>&)
{
  std::cout << "composed of C\n";
  printTypeComponents(T());
}

The advantage is that you do not need any typedefs inside the classes. If you want, you can put the logic inside printTypeComponentsImpl (or something like that) and have printTypeComponents delegate to that function.

You can avoid creating the temporaries, but since you cannot partially specialize functions, you'll have to move everything inside a struct and use that. If you want, I can put code example here.

edit: You could actually automate it a little bit with typeid(x).name(), provided you can extract the name of class template from it (named getTemplateName here).

template <template <typename> class T, typename U>
void printTypeComponents(const T<U>&)
{
  std::cout
    << "composed of "
    << getTemplateName(typeid(T<DummyClass>).name())
    << '\n';
  printTypeComponents(U());
}

For those interested, here's gcc specific example.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your answer –  relaxxx Aug 10 '11 at 10:14
add comment

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