Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Another newbie question...

The script (below) compares selected text in one div with some target text in another, then applies a style to the second div's parent. I need to change the script to be less literal---not "if A is selected, look for A"; but rather, "if Apples is selected, look for A."

So, how do you get jQuery to recognize two different text strings as being the same thing? I tried "var A = 'Apples', B = 'Bravo' [etc] ;", but then the class is added to .embox when I hover over any #menutable div.

The HTML:

    <div id="maintable">
     <div class="embox">
      content
      <div class="options">A,B,C</div>
     </div>
     <div class="embox">
      content
      <div class="options">B,F</div>
     </div>
     <!-- and about a hundred more just like these -->
    </div>

    <div id="menutable">
     <div class="optionA">Apples</div>
     <div class="optionB">Bravo</div>
     <div class="optionC">Comp</div>
     <div class="optionF">Ferengi</div>
    </div>

Current script (doesn't work):

$('#menutable div').hover(function() {
    var that = this, A = "Apples", B = "Bravo", C = "Comp", F = "Ferengi";
    $('#maintable .options').filter(function() {
        return $(this).text().indexOf($(that).text()) === -1;
    }).closest(".embox").addClass("bgtransp");
},
function() {
    $(".embox").removeClass("bgtransp");
});
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try to use jQuery's inArray() method to see if the value is within an array of values that you define.

Example:

$.inArray($(this).html(), ['Apples', 'A', 'Orange']);

In your code, check to see if the function returns something greater than -1. More info can be found in the jQuery docs linked above.

share|improve this answer
    
The parameters are just an example, you should change them to fit your needs. – Steve Aug 9 '11 at 18:47
1  
Since I can see how this will work, I've accepted the answer. For the record, however, I haven't tested it. I've found a way to make the literal match work in context. But down the road, when I'm a bit more comfortable with jQuery, I expect inArray() will be very useful. Thank you! – Diorist Aug 11 '11 at 19:01

Use data attributes

HTML

div id="menutable">
 <div class="option" data-letter="A">Apples</div>
 <div class="option" data-letter="B">Bravo</div>
 <div class="option" data-letter="C">Comp</div>
 <div class="option" data-letter="D">Ferengi</div>
</div>

JS

$('#menutable div').hover(function() {
    var that = this;
    $('#maintable .options').filter(function() {
        return $(this).text().indexOf($(that).data('letter')) === -1;
        //seems to be !== -1 
    }).closest(".embox").addClass("bgtransp");
},
function() {
    $(".embox").removeClass("bgtransp");
});

Besides, You can get first letter from string useing stringname[0]

share|improve this answer
1  
Is 'data-letter' valid html? – dave Aug 9 '11 at 18:41
    
@dave yes it's valid html5. – RiaD Aug 9 '11 at 18:45
    
Since some of my clients are likely still on old browsers, I need to steer clear of HTML5. I think there's a way to adapt your suggestion by using the jQuery data() method, but the two things together are a bit over my head. – Diorist Aug 11 '11 at 18:49
    
@Diorist: I think it should work in old browsers too. It will incorrect attribute for this browsers and they will be ignore it – RiaD Aug 11 '11 at 18:53
    
also you can set data by JS and you HTMLcode will be clean in fact – RiaD Aug 11 '11 at 18:54

if you don't want to use HTML5 data-*, you can use

var myArray = ['Apples', 'A', 'Orange'];
var i=0;
$("#menutable > .option").each(
   function(){
     $(this).data("myOption",myArray[i]);
     i++;
});

and you can get the data using

$('#menutable > .option').click(function() {
   var myOption = $(this).data("myOption");
}

note: its more web standard to set the id like menu-table instead of menutable :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the ID naming advice and for your suggestion. Along with S.K.'s suggestion, it helps to demystify arrays. – Diorist Aug 11 '11 at 19:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.