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I'm using the following tester to try and figure out this regex: http://derekslager.com/blog/posts/2007/09/a-better-dotnet-regular-expression-tester.ashx

My input: 123stringA 456 stringB

My pattern: ([0-9]{3})(.*?)

The pattern will eventually be a date but for this question's sake, I'll keep it simple and use my simplified input.

The way I understand this pattern, it's "give me 3 numbers [0-9]{3}, followed by any number of characters of any kind .*, until it reaches the next match ?

What I want/expect out of this test is 2 matches with 2 groups each:
Match 1
   Group 1 - 123
   Group 2 - stringA
Match2
   Group 1 - 456
   Group 2 - stringB

For some reason, the tester at the link I provided sees that there is a second group, but it's coming up blank. I have done this with PHP before and it seemed to work as I described, but in C# I'm seeing different results. Any help you can provide would be appreciated.

I should also note that this could expand multiple lines...

  • EDIT *

Here's the actual input: 2011-08-09 09:25:57,069 [9] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager - Error loading extension 2011-08-09 09:25:57,493 [8] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager

For match 1 I'm wanting to get: 2011-08-09 09:25:57 and ,069 [9] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager - Error loading extension

and for match 2: 2011-08-09 09:25:57 and ,493 [8] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager

I'm trying to find a good way to parse an error log file that's in one giant text file and maintain the date the error happened and the details that went along with it

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1  
What if you test it in Visual Studio? –  BoltClock Aug 9 '11 at 19:15
1  
@tjans You should accept answers to your previous questions. (Click the check-mark next to the one most helpful to you.) –  dlras2 Aug 9 '11 at 19:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first group matches 3 digits and the second group matches the remainder of the string because there's nothing in the pattern to prevent the .*? from not matching the remainder of the string.

CORRECTION: The second group matches an empty string because there's nothing in the pattern to prevent the .*? from not matching an empty string.

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Ahh, so I'd need to provide some kind of delimiter that comes before the beginning of the next match... –  tjans Aug 9 '11 at 19:19
    
*? makes it non-greedy which won't match remainder of string fully –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:25
    
@Mrchief: Oops! You're right. –  MRAB Aug 9 '11 at 19:26

.* means match anything zero or more times. ? Mean to find the minimal number of times, so it chooses zero matches as the minimum.

Try this pattern, ([0-9]{3})([a-zA-Z]*)

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*? makes it non-greedy. –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:25
    
@Mrchief, OK, thats what I said isn't it? From MSDN *? Matches the previous element zero or more times, but as few times as possible. –  Kratz Aug 9 '11 at 19:27
    
yes but your pattern is not sufficient since the OP wants any characters, not just alpha. –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:28
    
Correct, I'd need any character... –  tjans Aug 9 '11 at 19:30
    
@tjans, your pattern can't be any characters, you will then match 123 and then the rest of the string. Something in the text has to signify the break. When I looked it seemed like you were matching number, string, number, string. This pattern will match that. –  Kratz Aug 9 '11 at 19:38

According to your comment, this is what you want to match

2011-08-09 09:25:57,069 [9] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager - Error loading extension 2011-08-09 09:25:57,493 [8] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager - Error loading extension

This expression will match the Date in the first capturing group and the rest till the next date OR till the end of the string in the second capturing group.

(\d{4}(?:-\d{2}){2})(.*?)(?=(?:\d{4}(?:-\d{2}){2}|$))

See it here on Regexr

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Thanks for being patient people...I updated the original question. I'll give this a shot... –  tjans Aug 9 '11 at 19:58
    
This one doesn't seem to be working...I get 0 matches when I run that pattern... –  tjans Aug 9 '11 at 20:03
    
Its working on Regexr, how do you use it? One thing out of my mind, you should build your regex this way in c#: @"(\d{4}(?:-\d{2}){2})(.*?)(?=(?:\d{4}(?:-\d{2}){2}|$))". Without the @ you would need double escaping. –  stema Aug 9 '11 at 20:25

Not sure why the tool gives you that, but you can switch to this alternative pattern that works in .Net

([0-9]{3})([^0-9]*)

http://regexhero.net/tester/?id=155b8e2b-b851-46b9-8a84-b82f8d6963a1

Explanation:

In your previous pattern, the nongreedy version was matching 0 characters.

In the new one, [^0-9] says match any character other than the range 0-9 (note the negation ^ specifier).

Update: Given the actual input string (in comments), the pattern changes to (its a guess assuming what the OP wants to do:

,([0-9]{3})([^\n]*)

http://regexhero.net/tester/?id=155b8e2b-b851-46b9-8a84-b82f8d6963a1

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Interesting, that does actually work...I'm not sure why...can you explain? –  tjans Aug 9 '11 at 19:33
    
I'm trying to apply that to:2011-08-09 09:25:57,069 [9] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager - Error loading extension 2011-08-09 09:25:57,493 [8] Orchard.Environment.Extensions.ExtensionManager - Error loading extension –  tjans Aug 9 '11 at 19:36
    
Updated my answer. –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:38
    
That's much more complicated. What's your expected output? You should update your question with the actual input string. –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:42
    
I added an update to my answer, check it out. –  Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 19:49

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