Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

It is important to me that my syntax does not make other developers confused.

In this example, I need to know if a parameter is a certain type.

I have hit this before; what's the most elegant, clear approach to test "not is"?

Method 1:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if (!(e.parameter is MyClass)) { /* do something */ }
}

Method 2:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.parameter is MyClass) { } else { /* do something */ }
}

Method 3:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    var _Parameter = e.parameter as MyClass;
    if (_Parameter != null) { /* do something */ }
}

Method 4:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    var _Type = typeof(MyClass);
    switch (e.parameter.GetType())
    { 
      case _Type: /* do nothing */; break;
      default: /* do something */; break;
    }
}

[EDIT] Method 5:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if ((e.parameter is MyClass) == false) { /* do something */ }
}

Which is the most straight-forward approach?

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by JNK, RiaD, Bo Persson, Fosco, Cody Gray Aug 10 '11 at 1:26

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
#1 if you don't need to use the casted result, #3 if you do. #2 when you're trying to be intentionally obfuscatory. #4 is not valid C#. – dlev Aug 9 '11 at 19:57
1  
Method 2 is always a bad idea compared to method 1 – dtanders Aug 9 '11 at 19:57
    
A better question might be, why are you needing to check, and what is the "something" that you intend to perform if it is not of the type you expect? – CaffGeek Aug 9 '11 at 19:58
1  
On whether to choose as over is, there's some related reading here – Mark H Aug 9 '11 at 20:14
    
Ugh. Somehow this got closed as "off topic", which is obviously invalid. It should have been closed as "not constructive". The answers you've gotten are perfectly fine (choose example 1), but subjective "best practices" style questions are generally frowned upon here because they often lead to extended discussion and debate. – Cody Gray Aug 10 '11 at 1:28

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would go for 3 if you need the variable later or 1 if you don't need the variable. 2 is ugly because of the empty block.

However I think they all are straight-forward.

share|improve this answer

This is obviously a matter of personal opinion and style, so there's no right answer, but I think this is clearest:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if ((e.parameter is MyClass) == false) { /* do something */ }
}

The == false is just more obvious than the !

share|improve this answer
2  
+1: I could read clear code like this all day :o) – Neil Knight Aug 9 '11 at 20:01
    
Thanks! I rock at the one-line functions... shame real programs aren't as straight-forward ;-) – Steve Mallam Aug 9 '11 at 20:04
    
As much as I hate explicitly comparing to true or false I actually like this. – Davy8 Aug 9 '11 at 20:18
    
Obvious code is a pleasure to read. – Nate Aug 9 '11 at 20:30
    
Agree - the Negation Operator is probably the single nastiest thing about C# – Tao Aug 11 '11 at 11:37

I would think just making an extension method would be a clear way of doing it:

public static bool CannotBeCastAs<T>(this object actual)
    where T: class
{
    return (actual as T == null);
}

You then simply make a check like so:

if(myObject.CannotBeCastAs<SomeClass>())
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
Why does everything need an extension method? The built in operators are clear enough, and I don't need to look up how all your extension methods are defined. Extension methods are useful, but you don't need to make everything an extension method. – CodesInChaos Aug 9 '11 at 21:57
    
public static void Everything(this object actual) { Console.WriteLine("I can too!"); } – Tejs Aug 9 '11 at 22:08

Methods 1 and 3 would be my picks, depending on what I actually wanted.

Method 1 "does something" if and only if the passed object is not of the expected type. This means the passed object could be null and still pass.

Method 3 "does something" if the passed object is not of the expected type, OR if the object is null. This is basically a one-pass check that you have a "valid" instance of the class to work with further.

So, whether I wanted 1 or 3 depends on what I was planning to do. Usually, when the variable isn't of the expected type or is null, I want to throw an exception. If I were happy with throwing just one type of exception (say just an ArgumentException), I'd use method 3. If I wanted to check for null separately and throw an ArgumentNullException, I'd use method 1 and add the null check.

Method 2 is functionally correct, but I'd rather invert the if condition as in Method 1, as an if block that does nothing is redundant.

I would never do Method 4. A switch statement taking the place of a simple if-else is unnecessary and confusing, especially in the manner you're using it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for discussing the value of Method #3 - more common in my experience for one off type checks. – jdasilva Aug 9 '11 at 22:01

To me, Method 1 is the most straight-forward, both on its own and by convention. This is the syntax I've seen the most if you just need to know if an object "is-a" certain class.

If you actually need to do something with the object "as-a" certain class, then Method 3 is the way to go.

share|improve this answer

Method 1 is the best in my view. It's very obvious what the code is doing and I can follow right along. Method 2 introduces unnecessary syntax that is easily corrected by Method 1. Method 3 requires me to think more than the other two (marginally, but still!), and it also uses extra space that isn't needed.

Remember code is written for people to read, and only after for machines to execute. Go with clarity every time.

share|improve this answer

If you want elegance and readability:

void MyBinding_Executed(object sender, ExecutedRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    bool isMyClass = e.parameter is MyClass;
    if (!isMyClass) // or isMyClass == false
    { 
        /* do something */ 
    }
}

I've always tried my best not to put too much logic in a single line of code, specially if conditions. I think the type check and negation operator might be annoying to parse on first glance.

share|improve this answer

Method #5 (a different spin)

public static class TypeExtensions
{
    public static bool IsNotTypeOf<T, X>(this T instance, X typeInstance)
    {
        return instance.GetType() != typeInstance.GetType();
    }
}

// ...

if(e.parameter.IsNotTypeOf(MyClass)) { /* do something */ } ;
share|improve this answer
    
This does not handle null – Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 9 '11 at 21:26
    
Thought about that, but then the question is, what should happen if one is null? Does 2 null types means they are same? I left that decision to the OP as I think causing an exception by default would be the proper thing. – Mrchief Aug 9 '11 at 21:33
    
Yes but instance.GetType() would throw a NRE. – Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 9 '11 at 22:47
    

I would be of the opinion that braced functionality should always match whatever brace pattern is in use in your application. For instance, in the case of iteration or conditional blocks, if you use:

If (foo != bar)
{
    //Do Something
}

well then this should be how you use brace patterned functionality at all times. One of my biggest bugbears with reading other peoples code (and this is especially true if they use CodeRush or Resharper) is the unnecessary terseness people add for no other reason than to display wizardry.

I am not saying the above is the best brace matching pattern however, use whatever one you feel comfortable with, what I would like to get across is that the pattern does not matter so much as the consistency of its use.

Personally, since C# is a terse language in comparison to, say VB.Net I would use long form statements or assignments (with the exception of var initialising) over more condense syntax to help aid later readability.

share|improve this answer
    
This would not work for a type check – Jerry Nixon - MSFT Aug 9 '11 at 21:27
    
My answer was directed more at the semantic side of the question, that is the structure. I may not have got my point across correctly which was whichever method you choose be consistent in your code layout. – deanvmc Aug 10 '11 at 20:41

I like an approach used by one of the NUnit Assert's:

Assert.InstanceOf<MyType>(objectInstance);

BTW, If you have a set of checks whether object is of specific type like:

if(objectInstance is TypeA)
{
  // ...
}else
{
  if(objectInstance is TypeC)
  {
    // ...
  }
}

There should be some design issues like tied coupling between few types, so consider an other approach like injected map of associations or map like algorithm method per type

IDictionary<Type, Func<TParameter>>
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.