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I have this basic script in bash:

SOFT=apt-fast
FILE=$SOFT.sh
PATH=$SRCF/$FILE
WWW=http://www.mattparnell.com/linux/apt-fast/$FILE
EXEC=/usr/bin/apt-fast
wget -v -U firefox $WWW -O $PATH
mv $PATH $EXEC

The rendered code (with the debugging turned on) is as follows:

SOFT=apt-fast
+ SOFT=apt-fast
FILE=$SOFT.sh
+ FILE=apt-fast.sh
PATH=$SRCF/$FILE
+ PATH=/home/rgr/src/apt-fast.sh
WWW=http://www.mattparnell.com/linux/apt-fast/$FILE
+ WWW=http://www.mattparnell.com/linux/apt-fast/apt-fast.sh
EXEC=/usr/bin/apt-fast
+ EXEC=/usr/bin/apt-fast
wget -v -U firefox $WWW -O $PATH
+ wget -v -U firefox http://www.mattparnell.com/linux/apt-fast/apt-fast.sh -O /home/rgr/src/apt-fast.sh
cleanstart.sh: line 132: **wget: command not found**
mv $PATH $EXEC
+ mv /home/rgr/src/apt-fast.sh /usr/bin/apt-fast
cleanstart.sh: line 133: **mv: command not found**
exit
+ exit

I have tried almost everything... What foolish mistake am I making here? The script is beeing called like this:

sudo bash -vx script.sh #-v for verbose and -x for turning debug mode on

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

You've deleted your path with

PATH=$SRCF/$FILE

leaving only that one something/something value in there.

The path environment variable tells the shell where it should look for executables, and you've toasted it.

Use a different variable name to handle your urls for wget.

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I don't think OP intended to use PATH as the special variable used to locate binaries. Look at how it's used in the script. –  Pierre Bourdon Aug 9 '11 at 20:17
1  
Pierre: doesn't tmatter. PATH is a standard environment variable in unix shells, holding the system path. –  Marc B Aug 9 '11 at 20:19
    
This is the correct answer. PATH shouldn't be used as a variable. –  mtahmed Aug 9 '11 at 20:21
    
You're right. That's indeed a stupid mistake... –  Roger Aug 9 '11 at 20:21

This one is easy :> its because you override the "PATH" variable. that is of course the one the system needs in order to find the location of "wget" iteself.

:>

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Fast and sharp, thank you. –  Roger Aug 9 '11 at 20:20

One of the variables in your script is called PATH. PATH is also the name of the special variable used to find executables.

Using another variable name should fix your problem.

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