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On my laptop running Win7, when I set the display setting to 125%, the DPI shows up as 120 (using both graphics.DpiX and GetDeviceCaps) as expected. However, with the display at 150%, the DPI is 96 (?!), just like it is at 100%. Does anyone know a) why this is the case and b) is there any other way other than checking the DPI to detect if the display is set to anything other than 100%? I'm writing an app that I want to display a message when the display is set to >= 150%.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

On Windows Vista and Windows 7, with DPIs above 120 (I think) and applications that it considers to be non-DPI aware, they switch into DPI Virtualization Mode.

This does exactly what you're seeing - the application thinks it's running in 96dpi while Windows blows it up and renders everything bigger (and blurrier).

For more details: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd464660(VS.85).aspx#dpi_virtualization

The article explains how to disable it on a per-application basis.

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Thank you very much for the response. I disabled DPI Virtualization Mode and now my app works as expected. Thanks again! –  Matt Aug 10 '11 at 2:53
2  
If your application can actually handle high DPI, you can mark it as "DPI aware" by adding a chunk to your manifest or by calling SetProcessDPIAware during initialization, which is better than customizing individual machines. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Adrian McCarthy Mar 2 '13 at 16:07

I've just struggled the same problem, and though there are a lot of DPI-related questions on StackOverflow, I did not find all the answers in one place.

The answer to question a) is the easier one: Starting with Windows Vista, Windows supports two kinds of DPI-related resizing. If you click on "Set custom text size (DPI)" on Display settings, you can see that by default, 125% uses the Windows XP-compatible resizing, while 150% doesn't.

Custom DPI Settings


Question b) is a trickier one. If you search StackOverflow, usually you can find the following answer:

    using (Graphics screen = Graphics.FromHwnd(IntPtr.Zero))
    {
        IntPtr hdc = screen.GetHdc();
        int dpiX = GetDeviceCaps(hdc, DeviceCaps.LOGPIXELSX);
        screen.ReleaseHdc(hdc);
    }

However, it will return always 96, regardless of actual DPI settings, unless...
- You use Windows XP or the compatibility mode is checked in at DPI settings. Problem: you cannot enforce it at the users.
- DWM is turned off (you use Basic or Classic themes). Problem: same as above.
- You call SetProcessDPIAware function before using GetDeviceCaps. Problem: This function should be called once, before all other rendering. If you have an existing DPI-unaware app, changing the awareness will ruin the whole appearance. It cannot be turned off once you called the function.
- You call SetProcessDpiAwareness before and after using GetDeviceCaps. Problem: This function requires at least Windows 8.1

The real working solution

It seems that the GetDeviceCaps function is not fully documented at MSDN. At least I discovered that pinvoke.net mentions a few further options that can be obtained by the function. At the end I came out with the following solution:

public static int GetSystemDpi()
{
    using (Graphics screen = Graphics.FromHwnd(IntPtr.Zero))
    {
        IntPtr hdc = screen.GetHdc();

        int virtualWidth = GetDeviceCaps(hdc, DeviceCaps.HORZRES);
        int physicalWidth = GetDeviceCaps(hdc, DeviceCaps.DESKTOPHORZRES);
        screen.ReleaseHdc(hdc);

        return (int)(96f * physicalWidth / virtualWidth);
    }
}

And the required additional code:

private enum DeviceCaps
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Logical pixels inch in X
    /// </summary>
    LOGPIXELSX = 88,

    /// <summary>
    /// Horizontal width in pixels
    /// </summary>
    HORZRES = 8,

    /// <summary>
    /// Horizontal width of entire desktop in pixels
    /// </summary>
    DESKTOPHORZRES = 118
}

/// <summary>
/// Retrieves device-specific information for the specified device.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="hdc">A handle to the DC.</param>
/// <param name="nIndex">The item to be returned.</param>
[DllImport("gdi32.dll")]
private static extern int GetDeviceCaps(IntPtr hdc, DeviceCaps nIndex);
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