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I am developing a simple webserver which handles the communication with the browser via XML.

In order to ensure that the type of the variables is correct, I wrap (most) of the attributes in my classes via getters/setters. Something like:

class Animal(object):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Animal, self).__init__()
        self.age = None

    def setAge(self, age):
        try:
            self._age = int(age)
        except TypeError:
            self._age = None

    def getAge(self):
        return self._age

    age = property(getAge, setAge)

The server also has an authentication and permissioning system (the typical login/password thingy...).

Let's say the logged user doesn't have permission to set the Animals' age in the server, but he's trying to (a bit of a huacker, we've got here, because the javascript should have disabled the 'age' input text but that's a different issue)... Back to the point!:

Right now, when I receive a POST, I open the XML contained in it, and check if someone is trying to set something he doesn't have permission to. Something like:

def receivePOST(request):
    xmlTree = Utilities.getXMLTree(request.body)
    loggedUser = Utilities.getLoggedUser()

    if xmlTree.findtext("age") and not loggedUser.hasPermission("setAge"):
        raise Exception("User %s was trying to change the age!!" % loggedUser.userName)

(of course, in the "real" server there are way more if...elif... because there are way more permissions to check)

I was wondering if it's a good idea to put do that permission checking in the getters/setters (well... in the setter, mainly). It would have to be something like this:

class Animal(object):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Animal, self).__init__()
        self.age = None

    def setAge(self, age):
        if age is not None:
            loggedUser = Utilities.getLoggedUser()
            if loggedUser.hasPermission("setAge"):
                try:
                    self._age = int(age)
                except TypeError:
                    self._age = None
            else:
                raise Exception("User %s was trying to change the age!!" % loggedUser.userName)
        else:
            self._age = None

On one hand, it seems a pretty natural place to check the permission when you're actually going to do something. That would also 'shield' all the classes in my server in a much more effective way (what if somehow the 'age' is being set without going through the 'receivePOST' method?... There wouldn't be a permission check in that case). On the other hand, that means that I can only use my Animal class in the server enviroment (where I have a 'loggedUser').

Also, I've read that properties should (ideally) be kept simple, and that is not a great practice start loading the getters/setters with code that can cause a lot of side effects (some people say that is difficult to track errors when the code just reads: myDuck.age = 512)

I don't know... What do you think?

Thank you!

Related:

When and how to use the builtin function property() in python

Python @property versus method performance - which one to use?

share|improve this question
3  
Not directly answering the question, but you should be using Python's property decorator (or equivalently, descriptors). Check out this link for more details: homepage.mac.com/s_lott/books/python/html/p03/… – Ceasar Bautista Aug 9 '11 at 21:54
1  
I'd suggest you use property idiomatically -- @property decorating def age(self): then @age.setter decorating def age(self, newage):. – agf Aug 9 '11 at 21:55

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