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Why does the paint even take so long?

public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        SuspendLayout();
        double scale = ClientSize.Width / 11;
        for (int i = 1; i < 10; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 1; j < 10; j++)
            {
                everybox[i - 1, j - 1] = new TextBox
                                             {
                                                 Location = new Point((int)(scale * i), (int)(scale * j)),
                                                 Size = new Size((int)scale - 2, (int)scale - 2),
                                                 Multiline = true
                                             };
                Controls.Add(everybox[i - 1, j - 1]);
            }
        }
        ResumeLayout();
    }


private void Form1_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        float scale = ClientSize.Width / 11;
        Graphics g = this.CreateGraphics();
        int counter = 0;
        for (float i = scale; i <= this.ClientSize.Width - scale; i += scale)
        {
            counter++;
            if ((counter - 1) % 3 != 0)
            {
                g.DrawLine(new Pen(Color.Black), new Point((int)i, (int)scale),
                           new Point((int)i, ClientSize.Width - (int)scale));
                g.DrawLine(new Pen(Color.Black), new Point((int)scale, (int)i),
                           new Point(ClientSize.Width - (int)scale, (int)i));
            }
            else
            {
                g.DrawLine(new Pen(Color.Black, 3f), new Point((int)i, (int)scale),
                           new Point((int)i, ClientSize.Width - (int)scale));
                g.DrawLine(new Pen(Color.Black, 3f), new Point((int)scale, (int)i),
                           new Point(ClientSize.Width - (int)scale, (int)i));
            }
        }
    }

It is rather annoying, and causes noticeable lag. everybox is a TextBox[9,9] object.

share|improve this question
    
Changing it to e.graphics makes it instant. Thank you. –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 23:06
    
I changed my comment to an answer below. –  LarsTech Aug 9 '11 at 23:08
    
Thank you. It was calling it many more times. Now the paint function does not even show on the profiler as an intensive function, thank you. I will accept this as an answer if you post it. –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 23:10
    
@Lars: Good point. soandos: If this is the answer to your question, why didn't you ask the question "what makes my paint event slow?". Asking one question and then accepting an answer to a different question is kind of frustrating for the people who tried to address the actual question you asked. –  Igby Largeman Aug 9 '11 at 23:42
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Per my comment, change:

Graphics g = this.CreateGraphics();

to

e.Graphics
share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry. It seemed to me that my paint event was taking up a large amount of my processor time. It seemed to be called many many times. I will edit my question. –  soandos Aug 10 '11 at 0:03
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A possible reason is because you are trying to draw too many heavy-weight components. If my math is correct you are redrawing 9 * 9 * 9 * 9 = 6561 objects. WinForms are not designed to support redrawing of that many components in the efficient way.

You may need to think if you really need to use that many heavy-weight graphic components with WinForms. There might be lighter components or you can switch to XNA (which has camera, views etc - all of that reduce the number of objects needed to be redrawn) or WPF depending on the context.

share|improve this answer
    
XNA is of course for developing games. WPF would be a better equivalent, which for example supports interactive controls –  Kieren Johnstone Aug 9 '11 at 22:16
    
I don't follow. I am drawing 81 textboxes, and 121 lines. When I do each one separately, they take no preceptable time. When I do them together it takes about half a second. –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 22:18
    
While this is for a game, its sudoku, not what I would generally call graphics intensive. I really just want to know why the paint event gets raised more than twice. –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 22:20
    
@soandos AFAIK paint event is constantly being called in a loop to redraw all the graphics in a Window. Maybe try a quick profiling session to see what's eating your CPU? –  oleksii Aug 9 '11 at 22:26
1  
@oleskii: the paint event only fires when the Control is redrawn, which only happens when there's a reason to redraw it. Not in a loop. –  Igby Largeman Aug 9 '11 at 22:33
show 8 more comments

The code you posted causes the paint event to fire 81 times (9*9). Once for each control being added to the form. Any more times are due to something that invalidates the form, like the mouse moving over it, another window moving over it, or the form resizing. Some code you aren't showing us may be responsible.

share|improve this answer
    
No actually, that is not the case. In addition, all of the controls get added without a single paint event getting called. There is no other code (an empty load event). –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 23:02
    
@soandos: it is the case. The paint event won't get called when you add the controls, because you're doing it in the constructor, before the window has been created. The paint event will get called when you show the form. At that time, it will get called 81 times. After that it will get called again any time the form is invalidated. –  Igby Largeman Aug 9 '11 at 23:16
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Paint can definitely get called alot and if you are getting too many calls, it probably has nothing to do with this bit of code. One thing that would help the performance of this particular bit is to try reducing the amount of work you do...

    Graphics g = e.Graphics;
    Pen bp = new Pen(Color.Black, 3f);
    Point start = new Point(0,0);
    Point stop = new Point(0,0);

    for (float i = scale; i <= this.ClientSize.Width - scale; i += scale)
    {
        int iAsInt = (int)i;
        int scaleAsInt = (int)scale;
        int w = ClientSize.Width;
        counter++;

        if ((counter - 1) % 3 != 0)
        {
            start.X = iAsInt;
            start.Y = scaleAsInt;
            stop.X = iAsInt;
            stop.Y = w-scaleAsInt;
            g.DrawLine(Pens.Black, start, stop);
            start.X = scaleAsInt;
            start.Y = iAsInt;
            stop.X = w-scaleAsInt;
            stop.Y = iAsInt;
            g.DrawLine(Pens.Black, start, stop);
            // Note: this looks like more work, but it is actually less
            // your code still has to make all the assignments in addition to 
            // newing up the points (and later having to garbage collect them)
        }
        else
        {
            // TODO: reuse the start/stop points here
            g.DrawLine(bp, new Point(iAsInt, scaleAsInt), new Point(iAsInt, w - scaleAsInt);
            g.DrawLine(bp, new Point(scaleAsInt, iAsInt), new Point(w - scaleAsInt, iAsInt));
        }
    }

To specifically stop the overdrawing of your lines, look at the ClipRectangle member of PaintEventArgs. If part of your line falls within the area of the clip rectangle, redraw it.

share|improve this answer
    
Forgive me, but how does this prevent the lines from being drawn many extra times? How does it cut down on the number of drawline calls? –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 22:57
1  
My original response didn't, but I was trying to help with your lag issue. I added a bit at the end specifically relating to your overdrawing problem. –  µBio Aug 9 '11 at 23:15
    
But its the same nubmer of commands. Just the math is easier. –  soandos Aug 9 '11 at 23:39
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