Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following toy program which cyclic shifts a vector and adds it to itself (under a mod). It does that for different shifts and high number of iterations (compared to the size of the vector). Program works, but its dog slow. I am still learning Haskell, so my question is: am I doing something wrong?

import Data.List (foldl')
import qualified Data.Sequence as Seq
import Data.Sequence (index, zipWith, Seq, (><), (<|), (|>))

seqSize = 100
numShifts = 10000 

cycleShift :: Integer -> Seq a -> Seq a
cycleShift s l = Seq.drop (fromInteger s) l >< Seq.take (fromInteger s) l

modAdd :: Seq Integer -> Seq Integer -> Seq Integer 
modAdd s t = Seq.zipWith (\ a b -> (a + b) `mod` 10^16) s t

step :: Seq Integer -> Integer -> Seq Integer
step l shift = modAdd l (cycleShift shift l)

allshifts = [i `mod` seqSize |i <- [1..numShifts]]
start = Seq.fromList (1 : [0 | i <- [1..(seqSize - 1)]])
end = foldl' step start allshifts

main :: IO ()
main = print (Seq.index end 0)

The same program in Python

seq_size = 100 
num_shifts = 10000

S = [i % seq_size for i in xrange(1, num_shifts + 1)]
ssums = [1] + [0 for i in range(seq_size - 1)]

for s in S: 
    shift = ssums[s:] + ssums[:s]  
    ssums = [(ssums[i] + shift[i]) % 10**16 for i in range(seq_size)]  

print ssums[0]

Here are the timings. Haskell: real 0m5.596s Python: real 0m0.551s

Python is not known for it's speed and yet is x10 times faster ?!?

share|improve this question
2  
You might want to check out Real World Haskell's performance tuning section first. It helped me learn some of the basics. book.realworldhaskell.org/read/profiling-and-optimization.html –  gatoatigrado Aug 9 '11 at 23:20
add comment

3 Answers

How are you running it?

I get 1.6 seconds for the Haskell version. (Compiled with ghc.exe -O2 seq.hs.)

Also, is there a reason you're using Seq? If I change it to use lists, I get 0.3 seconds execution time.

Here it is with lists:

import Data.List (foldl')

seqSize = 100
numShifts = 10000 

cycleShift s l = drop (fromInteger s) l ++ take (fromInteger s) l

modAdd s t = zipWith (\ a b -> (a + b) `mod` 10^16) s t

step l shift = modAdd l (cycleShift shift l)

allshifts = [i `mod` seqSize |i <- [1..numShifts]]
start = (1 : [0 | i <- [1..(seqSize - 1)]])
end = foldl' step start allshifts

main :: IO ()
main = print (end !! 0)
share|improve this answer
    
Using rem instead of mod should also provide some speedup. –  Axman6 Aug 9 '11 at 23:10
    
I tested it and it didn't make a difference. –  Porges Aug 9 '11 at 23:37
add comment
  1. Use plain lists. They are heavily optimized. Using Data.Vector is even faster.
  2. Use rem instead of mod
  3. Avoid unnecessary work. (see cycleShift. Before, you splitted the list twice)
  4. Use Int instead of Integer if your calculation may not exceed the bounds. The former is a hardware int, while the later is arbitrary precision, but emulated via software.

Result: 3.6 secs to 0.5 secs. More is probably possible.

Code:

import Data.List (foldl')
import Data.Tuple

seqSize, numShifts :: Int
seqSize = 100

numShifts = 10000 

cycleShift :: Int -> [a] -> [a]
cycleShift s = uncurry (++) . swap . splitAt s

modAdd :: [Int] -> [Int] -> [Int]
modAdd = zipWith (\ a b -> (a + b) `rem` 10^16)

step :: [Int] -> Int -> [Int]
step l shift = modAdd l (cycleShift shift l)

allshifts = map (`rem` seqSize) [1..numShifts]
start = 1 : replicate (seqSize - 1) 0
end = foldl' step start allshifts

main :: IO ()
main = print (head end)

Edit

It gets even faster by using Data.Vector. I get around 0.4 sec on my machine using this code:

import Data.List (foldl')
import Data.Tuple

import Data.Vector (Vector)
import qualified Data.Vector as V

seqSize, numShifts :: Int
seqSize = 100

numShifts = 10000 

cycleShift :: Int -> Vector a -> Vector a
cycleShift s = uncurry (V.++) . swap . V.splitAt s

modAdd :: Vector Int -> Vector Int -> Vector Int
modAdd = V.zipWith (\ a b -> (a + b) `rem` 10^16)

step :: Vector Int -> Int -> Vector Int
step l shift = modAdd l (cycleShift shift l)

allshifts = map (`rem` seqSize) [1..numShifts]
start = 1 `V.cons` V.replicate (seqSize - 1) 0
end = foldl' step start allshifts

main :: IO ()
main = print (V.head end)

Edit 2

Using Data.Vector.Unboxed (Just change the imports and fix up the signatures), the runtime drops down to 0.074 secs. But the results are only correct, if an Int has 64 bit. It may also be that fast using Int64 though.

share|improve this answer
1  
There's a slight problem here in that a Haskell Int is officially only guaranteed to cover the range [ - 2^29, 2^29 - 1]. Note that 10^16 is greater than 2^29, so you could easily get Int wraparound happening in this code if that rem actually ever kicks in. –  chrisdb Aug 9 '11 at 22:39
    
@chrisdb Sorry. GHC uses all 32 bits on x86 and 64 bits on x64 so I get no overflow. IMHO it changes not too much if you switch back to Integer. –  FUZxxl Aug 9 '11 at 22:41
    
I agree that an Int64 (or just Int on x64 if that's what GHC uses) is OK. An Int32 won't be in the general case (2^31 < 10^16, so wraparound happens before you hit the rem), so you'll just silently get the wrong answer. I'm not sure if it's an issue for numShifts = 10000 and seqSize = 100, so for this particular case you might get the right answer anyway. –  chrisdb Aug 9 '11 at 22:46
    
Just a note: The first two changes make no difference for me. I get exactly the same results after as before. –  Porges Aug 9 '11 at 23:00
    
And I get 0.15 for Vector version (twice as fast as lists) and 0.016 for Int32-unboxed version (but the wrong answer ;)). –  Porges Aug 9 '11 at 23:09
show 6 more comments

Ensure the Haskell code is compiled and the resulting executable is being timed, not the interpreted version of the code.

TheGeekStuff

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.