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Easiest way to explain is with an example:

mysql> select * from table_a left join table_b on col_a=col_b;
+-------+-------+
| col_a | col_b |
+-------+-------+
|     1 |  NULL |
|     2 |  NULL |
|     3 |     3 |
|     4 |     4 |
+-------+-------+

mysql> select * from table_a right join table_b on col_a=col_b;
+-------+-------+
| col_a | col_b |
+-------+-------+
|     3 |     3 |
|     4 |     4 |
|  NULL |     5 |
|  NULL |     6 |
+-------+-------+

But how do I get this?

mysql> select * from table_a ???? table_b on col_a=col_b;
+-------+-------+
| col_a | col_b |
+-------+-------+
|     1 |  NULL |
|     2 |  NULL |
|     3 |     3 |
|     4 |     4 |
|  NULL |     5 |
|  NULL |     6 |
+-------+-------+

Structure for @Abe:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `table_a` (
  `col_a` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`col_a`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;


INSERT INTO `table_a` (`col_a`) VALUES
(1),
(2),
(3),
(4);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `table_b` (
  `col_b` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`col_b`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;


INSERT INTO `table_b` (`col_b`) VALUES
(3),
(4),
(5),
(6);
share|improve this question
    
Can we see what the source tables look like? –  Abe Miessler Aug 9 '11 at 22:18
    
@Abe: I'm sure you can piece it together from those queries. table_a has 1 column col_a with values 1-4, likewise, table_b has values 3-6 –  Mark Aug 9 '11 at 22:23
    
You are correct @Mark I can. I can also figure out source code with no comments whatsoever. Doesn't mean I like to ;) –  Abe Miessler Aug 9 '11 at 22:24
    
@Abe: Fair point... but it should be pretty simple in this case :) –  Mark Aug 10 '11 at 1:05
    
yeah I agree that is pretty simple. –  Abe Miessler Aug 10 '11 at 3:57

2 Answers 2

Since there is no FULL OUTER JOIN option in MySQL I think you are limited to using a UNION:

select * from table_a left join table_b on col_a=col_b
UNION 
select * from table_a right join table_b on col_a=col_b
share|improve this answer

This article provides several ways of simulating a full outer join with MySQL.

http://www.xaprb.com/blog/2006/05/26/how-to-write-full-outer-join-in-mysql/

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah.... just stumbled upon that myself. –  Mark Aug 9 '11 at 22:26

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