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With LINQ i'm doing the following to select my suppliers and their product count:

from s in context.Suppliers 
join p in context.Products on s equals p.Supplier 
group s by s.CompanyName 
into result 
select new {   
    SupplierName = result.Key,   
    ProductCount = result.Count() 
}

this works just fine, but i want to select some more properties from my supplier table, SupplierId and SupplierAddress, like:

....    
select new {   
    SupplierName = result.Key,   
    ProductCount = result.Count(),   
    SupplierId = ..,   
    SupplierAddress = ..,  
    }

Does anyone know how to do this?

Thanks for helping!

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You are on the right track, just verify two things... Does your output class have a field to store SupplierId and SupplierAddress? You are only pasting part of the code, can we get the entire line, including the LINQ? –  EtherDragon Aug 9 '11 at 23:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So you're sure all Supplier groups with the same CompanyName are guranteed to have the same Id and Address?

from s in context.Suppliers 
join p in context.Products on s equals p.Supplier 
group s by s.CompanyName 
into result 
select new {   
    SupplierName = result.Key,   
    ProductCount = result.Count(),
    SupplierId = result.First().Id,
    SuppliedAddress = result.First().Address 
}

It would look more natural if you grouped by Id instead, or maybe all of them:

from s in context.Suppliers 
join p in context.Products on s equals p.Supplier 
group s by new { s.CompanyName, s.Id, s.Address } 
into result 
select new {   
    ProductCount = result.Count(),
    SupplierName = result.Key.CompanyName,   
    SupplierId = result.Key.Id,
    SuppliedAddress = result.Key.Address 
}
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3  
Implicit in result.FirstOrDefault().Id and result.FirstOrDefault().Address is the possibility of a null exception. –  spender Aug 9 '11 at 23:28
1  
I concur with splender. If you are going to use the value without checking for null, there's no point in using the OrDefault versions. –  svick Aug 9 '11 at 23:34
    
@svick: You're absolutely right, for some reason I imagined there is no First() method in LINQ. This is getting really late here and I think I need to get some sleep.. –  Dan Abramov Aug 9 '11 at 23:36
    
Yes, you're completely right that it's better to group by Id, but i just typed this as a quick example to make my question clear. –  Tys Aug 9 '11 at 23:36
    
The second example suits perfect! Thanks! –  Tys Aug 9 '11 at 23:38

EDIT

Um... Unless I'm mistaken, this can be done considerably more cleanly:

context
    .Products
    .GroupBy(p=>p.Supplier)
    .Select(result=>new {
        SupplierName = result.Key,   
        ProductCount = result.Count(),
        SupplierId = result.Key.Id,   
        SupplierAddress = result.Key.Address,  
    }

The joins come out of the box from the FK relationships in the DB, so a Product already has a Supplier. It seems you spotted this setup in your own code ( ...equals p.Supplier ), then failed to understand its meaning. Apologies for changing from comprehension syntax to method chains. They come more naturally to me.

Supplemental to @Dan's comment (which is likely correct for Linq2Objects), in Linq2Sql (I can't vouch for L2E, but I imagine it's much the same), if you group by a property that is generated by a FK relationship, the resulting generated SQL will GROUP BY the key value, not the entire entity.

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1  
Note that you'll also need Supplier to implement IEquatable for this to work. –  Dan Abramov Aug 9 '11 at 23:37
    
@Dan, I extended my answer to address your comment. –  spender Aug 9 '11 at 23:54
    
You're totally right, I overlooked that it's LINQ to SQL. –  Dan Abramov Aug 10 '11 at 0:10

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