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My understanding is that Java's implementation of HashMap uses "buckets" which point to a list of values to handle collisions and that an object will only ever be overridden if the hashCode() for the key AND the equals() for the object are BOTH the same for the object being added and the object it collides with.

I tried playing around with HashMap to try to see the collision behavior in action but no matter what I do, it always seems to override.

What am I doing wrong here (note I intentionally left "count" out of the hashCode and equals methods)?

public class HashMapTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    HashMapTest test = new HashMapTest();
    test.execute();
}

public void execute() {
    HashMap<String, Node> nodeMap = new HashMap<String, Node>();
    Node node1 = new Node("data1", 1);
    Node node2 = new Node("data2", 2);

    String key = "1";

    System.out.println("node1 hash: " + node1.hashCode());
    System.out.println("node2 hash: " + node2.hashCode());
    System.out.println("node1 hash == node2 hash? " + (node1.hashCode() == node2.hashCode() ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1.equals(node2)? " + (node1.equals(node2) ? "true" : "false"));

    nodeMap.put(key, node1);
    System.out.println("added node1 to hash map");
    System.out.println("hash map size: " + nodeMap.size());
    System.out.println("hash map entry set size: " + nodeMap.entrySet().size());
    System.out.println("hash map contains node1? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node1) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node2? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node2) ? "true" : "false"));

    nodeMap.put(key, node2);
    System.out.println("added node2 to hash map");
    System.out.println("hash map size: " + nodeMap.size());
    System.out.println("hash map entry set size: " + nodeMap.entrySet().size());
    System.out.println("hash map contains node1? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node1) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node2? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node2) ? "true" : "false"));
}

protected class Node {

    private String data;

    private Integer count;

    public Node(String data, Integer count) {
        this.data = data;
        this.count = count;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((data == null) ? 0 : data.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Node other = (Node) obj;
        if (data == null) {
            if (other.data != null)
                return false;
        }
        else
            if (!data.equals(other.data))
                return false;
        return true;
    }


    public String getData() {
        return data;
    }


    public void setData(String data) {
        this.data = data;
    }


    public Integer getCount() {
        return count;
    }


    public void setCount(Integer count) {
        this.count = count;
    }

}

}

It outputs:

node1 hash: 95356390
node2 hash: 95356391
node1 hash == node2 hash? false
node1.equals(node2)? false
added node1 to hash map
hash map size: 1
hash map entry set size: 1
hash map contains node1? true
hash map contains node2? false
added node2 to hash map
hash map size: 1
hash map entry set size: 1
hash map contains node1? false
hash map contains node2? true
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By the way, you can simplify your hashCode method to return data!=null ? data.hashCode() : 0; There's no need to add 1 and then multiply by 31. –  Steve Kuo Aug 10 '11 at 5:54
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4 Answers

The keys in the hashmap are hashed, not the values. In your case you are calling put(key, node), and key is constant, so the second put will override the first. If the node was the key, then you would have two entries.

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You should looking at the key not the value.

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If you read the javadoc for HashMap, you'll note that the put() method is defined as follows

put(Object key, Object value)

Associates the specified value with the specified key in this map.

When you call put() with the same key twice, it overrides the original value that was associated with that key.

On top of that, the table uses the hash of the key, not the value, to find the proper bucket.

Other than that, your understanding of the class is correct.

I do not believe, however, that you can view the collisions from the public API, as that is most likely dealt with inside the class.

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Okay that makes sense. I can modify it to use HashMap<Node, Node> and alter the hashCode() and equals() methods to get a collision and I see it build the list in the bucket the key's hashCode() mapped to. However, I noticed that if the key passed to put(K,V) is equal() to another key then it overrides the value. I thought it just used hashCode() to identify the bucket then used equal() for the value from there. Apparently, if the key equal()s another key then it replaces the value associated. Once I get past the 8hr limit to answer my question, I'll post code that highlights this distinction. –  Caleb Aug 10 '11 at 4:25
    
It uses hashCode() to identify the bucket, and the uses the equal() method on the key. Until it successfully retrieves a value, the maphas no idea what the value associated with a key is, so it couldn't use the equal() method on the value. The point of a HashMap is to have a 1:1 mapping of keys to values, if a single key mapped to multiple values it wouldn't be a very effective map, as it wouldn't be possible to retrieve all of the values! –  ty1824 Aug 10 '11 at 19:27
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Here's updated code that uses HashMap<Node,Node>. I also changed the equals() method to include the count field but left it out of the hashCode() method. This successfully creates a collision and if you look at the HashMap with a debugger you can see the list it is building in the bucket that had a collision:

public class HashMapTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    HashMapTest test = new HashMapTest();
    test.execute();
}

public void execute() {
    HashMap<Node, Node> nodeMap = new HashMap<Node, Node>();
    Node node1 = new Node("data1", 1);
    Node node2 = new Node("data2", 2);
    Node node3 = new Node("data1", 2);
    Node node4 = new Node("data1", 1);

    System.out.println("node1 hash: " + node1.hashCode());
    System.out.println("node2 hash: " + node2.hashCode());
    System.out.println("node3 hash: " + node3.hashCode());
    System.out.println("node1 hash == node2 hash? " + (node1.hashCode() == node2.hashCode() ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node2 hash == node3 hash? " + (node2.hashCode() == node3.hashCode() ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1 hash == node3 hash? " + (node1.hashCode() == node3.hashCode() ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1.equals(node2)? " + (node1.equals(node2) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node2.equals(node3)? " + (node2.equals(node3) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1.equals(node3)? " + (node1.equals(node3) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("");

    nodeMap.put(node1, node1);
    System.out.println("added node1 to hash map");
    System.out.println("hash map size: " + nodeMap.size());
    System.out.println("hash map entry set size: " + nodeMap.entrySet().size());
    System.out.println("hash map contains node1? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node1) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node2? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node2) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node3? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node3) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1's count from map: " + nodeMap.get(node1).getCount());
    System.out.println("");

    nodeMap.put(node2, node2);
    System.out.println("added node2 to hash map");
    System.out.println("hash map size: " + nodeMap.size());
    System.out.println("hash map entry set size: " + nodeMap.entrySet().size());
    System.out.println("hash map contains node1? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node1) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node2? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node2) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node3? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node3) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1's count from map: " + nodeMap.get(node1).getCount());
    System.out.println("");

    // note that if node4 is used then it replaces the value that stored node1
    nodeMap.put(node3, node3);
    System.out.println("added node3 to hash map");
    System.out.println("hash map size: " + nodeMap.size());
    System.out.println("hash map entry set size: " + nodeMap.entrySet().size());
    System.out.println("hash map contains node1? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node1) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node2? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node2) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("hash map contains node3? " + (nodeMap.containsValue(node3) ? "true" : "false"));
    System.out.println("node1's count from map: " + nodeMap.get(node1).getCount());
}

protected class Node {

    private String data;

    private Integer count;

    public Node(String data, Integer count) {
        this.data = data;
        this.count = count;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + getOuterType().hashCode();
        result = prime * result + ((data == null) ? 0 : data.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Node other = (Node) obj;
        if (!getOuterType().equals(other.getOuterType()))
            return false;
        if (count == null) {
            if (other.count != null)
                return false;
        }
        else
            if (!count.equals(other.count))
                return false;
        if (data == null) {
            if (other.data != null)
                return false;
        }
        else
            if (!data.equals(other.data))
                return false;
        return true;
    }


    public String getData() {
        return data;
    }


    public void setData(String data) {
        this.data = data;
    }


    public Integer getCount() {
        return count;
    }


    public void setCount(Integer count) {
        this.count = count;
    }

    private HashMapTest getOuterType() {
        return HashMapTest.this;
    }

}

}

It outputs:

node1 hash: 1077170390
node2 hash: 1077170391
node3 hash: 1077170390
node1 hash == node2 hash? false
node2 hash == node3 hash? false
node1 hash == node3 hash? true
node1.equals(node2)? false
node2.equals(node3)? false
node1.equals(node3)? false

added node1 to hash map
hash map size: 1
hash map entry set size: 1
hash map contains node1? true
hash map contains node2? false
hash map contains node3? false
node1's count from map: 1

added node2 to hash map
hash map size: 2
hash map entry set size: 2
hash map contains node1? true
hash map contains node2? true
hash map contains node3? false
node1's count from map: 1

added node3 to hash map
hash map size: 3
hash map entry set size: 3
hash map contains node1? true
hash map contains node2? true
hash map contains node3? true
node1's count from map: 1
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