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Should look like this:

[img] text text
      text text

How is this accomplished?

Seems straight forward, but I'm struggling.

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stay to the right - under no circumstances should there every be wrapping! –  JoJ Aug 10 '11 at 0:52
    
Okay, do you know the width of your image? –  Paulpro Aug 10 '11 at 0:55
    
Have you tried display:inline-block for both elements? Requires an IE7 & IE6 fix if you are supporting those browsers (display:inline). –  Beth Budwig Aug 10 '11 at 0:55
    
Paul, I know the width of the image. –  JoJ Aug 10 '11 at 0:58
    
Beth, inline-block works, how do I get it to work in IE7? –  JoJ Aug 10 '11 at 0:59

2 Answers 2

You can use display:inline-block;

img{
    display:inline-block;
    width:75px;
    height:100px;
    border:1px solid red;
    vertical-align:top;
    margin-right:10px;
}

div{
    display:inline-block;
    width:200px;
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/jasongennaro/SK9ad/

To make inline-block; work with IE7, add the following to each rule:

zoom: 1;
*display:inline;
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If you use this method and want to have stuff within the div then make sure to have them display:inline-block with width:100%. If this is incorrect and there is a better solution let me know. Thanks for the info though! –  Elias Dec 6 '13 at 23:21

Since you know the dimensions of the image:

HTML:

<div style="position: relative;">
    <img id="theimg" ... />
    <div id="besidetheimg">
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#theimg{
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    margin-top: -50px; // Half the width of the image
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
}

#besidetheimg{
    margin-left: 100px; // width of image
}

It's a bit of a weird way to do it. I'm not sure if there is a better way though, and it works: http://jsfiddle.net/dvLqC/

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Not that the top and the margin-top are used to vertically align the image to middle –  Paulpro Aug 10 '11 at 1:10
    
Using both a negative margin, and absolute positioning is less than ideal if you can avoid it. –  Elias Dec 6 '13 at 23:23

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