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If I do

my @answer = qw(java python perl c);
foreach (@answer){
          print "[$_]\n";
}

then it will print

[java]
[python]
[perl]
[c]


But, If I do this

my @answer = qw(java python perl c);
foreach (@answer){
       print "$answer[$_]\n";
}

then it will print

java java java java

Why is that??? Why do I have different output??

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4 Answers 4

Each element in the loop is put into $_. When you say $answer[$_], you're asking for the array element $answer['java'], $answer['python'], and so on. These strings turn into 0 in numeric context, and therefore what you get is $answer[0], which is java.

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7  
sucks when they don’t use warnings, doesn’t it? –  tchrist Aug 10 '11 at 1:58
    
Yep, it sure does. –  friedo Aug 10 '11 at 2:39

Your first loop:

foreach (@answer){
    print "[$_]\n";
}

Iterates over @answer and puts the current element of the @answer array in $_ on each pass through the loop. The result is that you get the elements of @answer printed in order.

Your second loop:

foreach (@answer) {
    print "$answer[$_]\n";
}

Does the same iteration with the same values in $_. But, and this is a big but, you're printing $answer[$_] and $_ is a string each time and that string is zero in a numeric context so you're effectively doing this:

print "$answer[0]\n";

four times in a row. Hence your four java strings. And your second chunk of sample output left out the newlines between the java strings.

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Huh? This is a warnings bug, not a strict bug. –  tchrist Aug 10 '11 at 1:59
    
@tchrist: True enough, my fingers have been programmed to use strict;use warnings; for so long that I've forgotten which warnings come from which things. –  mu is too short Aug 10 '11 at 2:06
    
strict never warns; it dies. Maybe you use FATAL warnings? –  tchrist Aug 10 '11 at 2:38

$_ is actually the string at the current index of the loop. It's equivalent to this in Java:

String[] x = new String[]{ "java", "perl"...};
for (String y : x) {
...
}

$_ would be equivalent to y.

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What you want to do is:

for (my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@answer); $i++)
{
    print "$answer[$i]\n";
}

or print $answer[0] to get first element of the array

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4  
If you want a counter, then for my $i ( 0 .. $#answer ) is a better idiom. –  friedo Aug 10 '11 at 1:50
1  
Or, if you have a sufficiently new Perl (5.12 or better), while (my($i, $a) = each @answer). –  Keith Thompson Aug 10 '11 at 2:40

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