Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am designing an automated trading software for the foreign exchange market. In a MYSQL database I have years of market data at five-minute intervals. I have 4 different metrics for this data alongside the price and time.

[Time|Price|M1|M2|M3|M4] 
x ~400,0000

Time is the primary key, and M1 through M4 are different metrics (such as standard deviation or slope of a moving average).

Here is a real example (excerpt:)

+------------+--------+-----------+--------+-----------+-----------+
|  Time      | Price  |     M1    |   M2   |    M3     |     M4    |
+------------+--------+-----------+--------+-----------+-----------+
| 1105410300 | 1.3101 |   12.9132 | 0.4647 |   29.6703 |        50 |
| 1105410600 | 1.3103 |    14.056 | 0.5305 | 29.230801 |        50 |
| 1105410900 | 1.3105 |   15.3613 | 0.5722 |   26.8132 |        25 |
| 1105411200 | 1.3106 | 16.627501 | 0.4433 | 24.395599 |  26.47059 |
| 1105411500 | 1.3112 |   18.7843 | 1.0019 | 24.505501 |    34.375 |
| 1105411800 | 1.3111 |   19.8375 | 0.5626 |        20 |   32.8125 |
| 1105412100 | 1.3105 |   20.0168 | 0.6718 |    9.7802 |   23.4375 |
| 1105412400 | 1.3105 |   20.4538 | 0.8943 |     7.033 |   23.4375 |
| 1105412700 | 1.3109 |   21.6078 | 0.4902 |   11.7582 |   29.6875 |
| 1105413000 | 1.3104 |   21.2045 |  1.565 |    8.6813 |    21.875 |
+------------+--------+-----------+--------+-----------+-----------+...400k more

Given an input of M1, M2, M3, and M4 I want (quickly and accurately) find the 5,000 closest matches.

Sample input:

+------------+--------+-----------+--------+-----------+-----------+
|  Time      | Price  |     M1    |   M2   |    M3     |     M4    |
+------------+--------+-----------+--------+-----------+-----------+
| 1205413000 | 1.4212 |   20.1045 | 1.0012 |    9.1013 |    11.575 |
+------------+--------+-----------+--------+-----------+-----------+

I figured that each of these metrics could be considered a 'dimension,' and that I can do a nearest neighbor search to locate the closest datapoints in this multidimensional space.

It seems the simplest way to do this is to iterate through every single data point and measure the multidimensional distance to my input point; but speed is of the essence!

I read about something called K-D Trees used for this purpose. Can anyone please explain or provide me with some material that explains how to implement this in MYSQL?

It may be relevant to mention that I can pre-process the table, but the input is received in real-time.

Currently I just make a rough cluster around the data on each dimension independently:

INSERT INTO Dim1 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M1) WHERE myTable.M1 < currentM1 ORDER BY M1 DESC LIMIT 2500;
INSERT INTO Dim1 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M1) WHERE myTable.M1 > currentM1 ORDER BY M1  ASC LIMIT 2500;

INSERT INTO Dim2 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M2) WHERE myTable.M2 < currentM2 ORDER BY M2 DESC LIMIT 2500;
INSERT INTO Dim2 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M2) WHERE myTable.M2 > currentM2 ORDER BY M2  ASC LIMIT 2500;

INSERT INTO Dim3 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M3) WHERE myTable.M3 < currentM3 ORDER BY M3 DESC LIMIT 2500;
INSERT INTO Dim3 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M3) WHERE myTable.M3 > currentM3 ORDER BY M3  ASC LIMIT 2500;

INSERT INTO Dim4 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M4) WHERE myTable.M4 < currentM4 ORDER BY M4 DESC LIMIT 2500;
INSERT INTO Dim4 SELECT * FROM myTable AS myTable USE INDEX(M4) WHERE myTable.M4 > currentM4 ORDER BY M4  ASC LIMIT 2500;

It is important to understand that I am interested in distance by rank, not by value.

Edit: I am a little closer to understanding how to do it (I think): I need to pre-process each row of each metric and assign it a percentile which would represent its location (percent-wise) in its range.

For example, for any given value of M1:

percentile = (#  rows with values less than input)/(# total rows) 

If I calculate the input's percentile and use that for a nearest neighbor search instead of the actual value I will have effectively scaled the various metrics such that they could be used as dimensions.

I am still lost on how to do the actual search though. Is this even possible to accomplish efficiently in MySQL?

share|improve this question
    
You say the search input is of M1, M2, M3, and M4, but your sample includes Time and Price. Are they included in the "closest" matches? How are you going to define close? The scale of M4 vs M2 for example is pretty big, so I don't think you necessarily want to search in a spherical manner... –  jswolf19 Aug 10 '11 at 4:41
    
@jswolf19 Time and Price are not included in the search. I want to define "close" by "number of events away from the input" - where each row in my main table is an event. Perhaps the dimensions need to be scaled first? –  Mikhail Furlender Aug 10 '11 at 4:51
    
Say the input for M2 is 2 and the input for M4 is 30. Would Time=1105413000 be closer or would Time=1105412400 be closer? –  jswolf19 Aug 10 '11 at 4:56
    
It may be a good idea to add columns for normalized data so that the "closeness" is comparable in the different dimensions. Will you be adding new data to insert into the table as the searches are performed? –  jswolf19 Aug 10 '11 at 4:58
    
@jswolf Is it really necessary to add new columns? Can't I just use the median or something like that instead? I intend to add new data, not literary AS the search is performed, but immediately after each time. –  Mikhail Furlender Aug 10 '11 at 5:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should be able to do a query like the following:

SELECT * FROM myTable
WHERE M1 BETWEEN searchM1 - radiusM1 AND searchM1 + radiusM1
  AND M2 BETWEEN searchM2 - radiusM2 AND searchM2 + radiusM2
  AND M3 BETWEEN searchM3 - radiusM3 AND searchM3 + radiusM3
  AND M4 BETWEEN searchM4 - radiusM4 AND searchM4 + radiusM4

In the case of a sphere, all the radius values will be the same, of course. You then adjust the radius until you get as close to the number of records you want. I'd suggest a binary search.

I'm not sure if you want to mess with the distribution or not, but assuming you do, you would just need to give each search value a rank between the two values it would fall between in your table (e.g. if rank 5 is 5.5, rank 6 is 5.9, and the search value is 5.6, then the search rank could be 5.5)

share|improve this answer
    
he's looking at closest points. THere could be millions of data within that interval. It's inefficient to compute all distance for all data. –  Jim Thio Jun 20 '12 at 21:52
    
@JimThio, if you have an idea of how to do what the OP wants efficiently using mysql, then you're more than welcome to provide an answer for them. –  jswolf19 Jun 21 '12 at 13:34
    
actually your answer is good enough for mysql. Mysql can't do efficient nearest neighbor search. I am looking for a better wya. –  Jim Thio Jun 21 '12 at 13:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.