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I want to convert this sample C# code into a java code:

public enum myEnum {
  ONE = "one",
  TWO = "two",
}; 

Because I want to change this constant class into enum

public final class TestConstants {
    public static String ONE = "one";
    public static String TWO= "two";
}
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6  
    
As for enums, there're many other correct answers below by now (and a must read link above) . Just wanted to add that if your class holds some constants like in your example (I am not talking about enums right now!!!) you can simply define interface this way: public interface TestConstants { String TEST = "test"; /*...*/ } Interface 'fields' are implicitly public static. – Arturs Licis Aug 10 '11 at 7:27
    
thanks....... :) – newbie Aug 10 '11 at 7:33
    
@Arturs Licis: Using an interface to hold constants is an anti-pattern. An interface is meant to define behavior. Use a regular class with a private constructor to hold constants. Static imports can be used to access the constants without putting the class name before. – JB Nizet Aug 10 '11 at 7:34
    
@JB Nizet: Completely agree, that's why I said 'I am not talking about enums right now!!!' I just showed a more accurate way to declare 'constants holder' (interface versus class). – Arturs Licis Aug 10 '11 at 8:01
up vote 48 down vote accepted
public enum MyEnum {
   ONE(1),
   TWO(2);
   private int value;
   private MyEnum(int value) {
      this.value = value;
   }
   public int getValue() {
      return value;
   }
}

In short - you can define any number of parameters for the enum as long as you provide constructor arguments (and set the values to the respective fields)

As Scott noted - the official enum documentation gives you the answer. Always start from the official documentation of language features and constructs.

Update: For strings the only difference is that your constructor argument is String, and you declare enums with TEST("test")

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What about a getter for value? – Bohemian Aug 10 '11 at 7:20
    
@Bohemian - I added it even before your comment :) – Bozho Aug 10 '11 at 7:21
    
There is a syntax error, this.value = value); – Erin Drummond Dec 1 '14 at 20:09

enums are classes in Java. They have an implicit ordinal value, starting at 0. If you want to store an additional field, then you do it like for any other class:

public enum MyEnum {

    ONE(1),
    TWO(2);

    private final int value;

    private MyEnum(int value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public int getValue() {
        return this.value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public enum MyEnum
{
    ONE(1),
    TWO(2);

    private int value;

    private MyEnum(int val){
        value = val;
    }

    public int getValue(){
        return value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
why the underscore? And the typical convention is to have the field, then the constructor, then the getter. – Bozho Aug 10 '11 at 7:25

Quite simply as follows:

/**
 * @author The Elite Gentleman
 *
 */
public enum MyEnum {
    ONE("one"), TWO("two")
    ;
    private final String value;

    private MyEnum(final String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return getValue();
    }
}

For more info, visit Enum Types from Oracle Java Tutorials. Also, bear in mind that enums have private constructor.


Update, since you've updated your post, I've changed my value from an int to a String.
Related: Java String enum.

share|improve this answer
    
whats the advantange of declaring value as final? – wib Mar 31 at 9:56
    
enum's are constants in Java so placing value as final just "reaffirms" the constant-ness of the enum. – Buhake Sindi Mar 31 at 12:31
public enum NewEnum {
   ONE("test"),
   TWO("test");

   private String s;

   private NewEnum(String s) {
      this.s = s);
   }

    public String getS() {
        return this.s;
    }
}
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Well, in java, you can also create a parameterized enum. Say you want to create a className enum, in which you need to store classCode as well as className, you can do that like this:

public enum ClassEnum {

ONE(1, "One"), 
TWO(2, "Two"),
THREE(3, "Three"),
FOUR(4, "Four"),
FIVE(5, "Five")
;

private int code;
private String name;

private ClassEnum(int code, String name) {
    this.code = code;
    this.name = name;
}

public int getCode() {
    return code;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

}

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