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I have a xml file, which i need to modify from my ruby script and save it. xml file looks something like `

<mtn:messages>

 <mtn:message correlation-key="0x" sequence="4">

  <mtn:header>

   <mtn:protocol-version>0x4</mtn:protocol-version>

    <mtn:message-type>0x0F04</mtn:message-type>

     <mtn:ttl>4</mtn:ttl>

     <mtn:qos-class-of-service>0</mtn:qos-class-of-service>

     <mtn:qos-priority>2</mtn:qos-priority>

      </mtn:header>

</mtn:message>

  </mtn:messages>

</mtn:test-case>

<mtn:test-case title="Train-Consist-Message">

<mtn:messages>

 <mtn:message correlation-key="0x" sequence="4">

  <mtn:header>

   <mtn:protocol-version>0x4</mtn:protocol-version>

    <mtn:message-type>0x0F04</mtn:message-type>

     <mtn:ttl>4</mtn:ttl>

     <mtn:qos-class-of-service>0</mtn:qos-class-of-service>

     <mtn:qos-priority>2</mtn:qos-priority>

      </mtn:header>

</mtn:message>

  </mtn:messages>

</mtn:test-case>`

I need to replace <mtn:ttl>4</mtn:ttl> with <mtn:ttl>some other value</mtn:ttl> which comes under <mtn:test-case title="Train-Consist-Message"> and save it.

I have written below code, but its replacing all occurances of <mtn:ttl>4</mtn:ttl>.

`doc = IO.read(ENV['CadPath1']+ "conf\\cad-mtn-config.xml")
 doc.gsub!(pattern, str)
 File.open("File path", "w"){|fh| fh.write(doc)}`

Please help me with this. Waiting for your early reply...

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3  
Your pattern (not shown) is probably wrong. Moreover I would not use regex to parse XML document. –  Emiliano Poggi Aug 10 '11 at 8:02

2 Answers 2

String#gsub! modifies the string in-place, replacing all instances with the replacement specified. If you only want to replace the first instance, use String#sub or String.sub!.

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The suggestion from Mike about using sub instead of gsub is good. But parsing XML (and HTML) with regular expression is usually frowned upon.

From your question I assume that you locate the to-be-modified element in terms of parent-child relations, not in terms of the source code order (i.e. you will not be able to say: "modify the second occurrence of this pattern"), so inventing a reliable regular expressions may be very, very hard.

You should use a parser library to find the element you want to change. There is a pretty large collection of those. See some of them at http://ruby-toolbox.com/categories/html_parsing.html and pick one, or use a built-in REXML library.

Alternatively, you could use a very simple 'html-scanner' module, which is included in Rails' ActionController (action_controller/vendor/html-scanner.rb), but if you do not use Rails, I am not sure whether extracting it is worth your time.

The exact code will depend on the parser you choose. Usually they have pretty good documentation/tutorials, so I am sure you will be able to handle it.

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Agree 100% that if you're looking to run find-and-replace string ops on XML then most likely you're doing it wrong (do we/should we have YDIW as a handy shortcut for that, btw? Just Googled: apparently we do ). But that's a big topic, so I selfishly limited myself to fixing his specific gsub/sub misunderstanding ;-) –  Mike Woodhouse Aug 11 '11 at 8:33

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