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I have a table in an Oracle database with a timestamp column nextTime and a string column destName. There are more columns as well, but only these two are relevant in this case. I'm trying to design a query that will return distinct destName having nextTime within a specific interval and the returned number of rows should be maximum one thousand. When there are more than one thousand distinct destName within the interval I want the query to return one thousand rows, netiher more nor less.

I actually have a query that is working, but it is way too slow:

select destName 
from (select /*+ index(tblDestNames tbldestnames_destname)*/ distinct destName
from (select /*+ index(tblDestNames tbldestnames_nextTime)*/ destName
from tblDestNames 
where nextTime < :1 and nextTime >= :2 and destName is not null)) 
where rownum <= 1000; 

Any ideas on how to design a smarter query or how to optimize this exisiting one are very much appreciated.

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Do the arguments :1 and :2 bind in a way that :1 > :2? If not the query won't return anything. If yes, it might be better to write nextTime >= :2 and nextTime < :1 to emphasize the order of the parameters. –  Aleksi Yrttiaho Aug 10 '11 at 11:19
    
@Aleksi: Thanks for your comment! Yes, :1 > :2 is always true. Your suggested change makes sense and I will apply it. –  joaerl Aug 10 '11 at 16:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am not sure that there is a reason not to simplify the query to this:

select destName 
from (
    select distinct destName
    from tblDestNames 
    where nextTime < :1 and nextTime >= :2 and destName is not null
    )
where rownum <= 1000; 

However, this will not solve your performance issue. The problem is this:

where rownum <= 1000

By replacing rownum with 'rank' and 'over' you would get something like:

select distinct destName
from (
    select
       destName
    from
       (select destName, rank()
        over (order by destName desc ) rnk
        from tblDestNames
        where nextTime < :1 and nextTime >= :2 and destName is not null) 
    where rnk <= 1000;
    )

The bonus is that with 'over' you choose the order of the results that will show and the ones that will not show.

EDIT: Actually it can be further simplified into:

select
   distinct destName
from
   (select destName, rank()
    over (order by destName desc ) rnk
    from tblDestNames
    where nextTime < :1 and nextTime >= :2 and destName is not null) 
where rnk <= 1000;
share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't you be able to move DISTINCT to the subquery? After that the the whole thing could be done without a subquery at all. –  Aleksi Yrttiaho Aug 10 '11 at 9:51
    
Aleksi, I was not sure and I tried to put the rank-over part on the 'where' clause where oracle complained with ORA-30483. I also tried to include it in the 'select distinct' part but then I could not limit the rnk to 1000 results. There must be a workaround but I cannot find it now. –  Uphill_ What '1 Aug 10 '11 at 10:50
    
rank cannot be used in WHERE or HAVING so a subquery is needed. Perhaps dense_rank would be more approriate here though as it does not skip over certain ranks. Now, if there is 1000 instance of destName x, the next destName would have rank 1001 and the result would only constist of the one destName. –  Aleksi Yrttiaho Aug 10 '11 at 11:16
    
Thank you for the reply! The query could definitely be simplified as suggested in the first code block. However, performance does not seem to be improved by the last statement. The inner query could possibly return quite a lot of rows and ordering them and then selecting disitinct destName probably is very costly. Do you think there is a way to reduce the number of rows returned by the inner query? And could the ordering be skipped? –  joaerl Aug 10 '11 at 16:50

Things I picked up

  1. You should leave execution plan optimization to the RDBMS unless you really know better
  2. There's no need to return duplicate names from the innermost subquery

Simpler query with slighly different semantics:

SELECT destName
FROM (SELECT DISTINCT destName
      FROM tblDestNames
      WHERE destName IS NOT NULL 
        AND nextTime NOT BETWEEN :1 and :2)
WHERE rownum <= 1000;

Note that BETWEEN is inclusive i.e. x BETWEEN y AND z equals y <= x <= z. To exclude the upper bound you'll either have to do it the way you did or decrement the parameter :2 by one of what ever unit nextTime is.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer! The suggested query is definitely a nicer reprecentaion of the original query. However, the performance is not greatly improved. There could be quite a lot of records fulfilling the requirements of the inner query (not null and between). Could the select distinct be to costly? I tried without nested queries first, but the problem was that I could get as few as 1 row in the results set if the first 1000 rows contained the same destName.. –  joaerl Aug 10 '11 at 16:54

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