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What is wrong in this function?

function getTuittingCookie() {
var tuitting_cookie = $.cookie("tuittingID");
$("#tuittingID").val(tuitting_cookie);
//alert(tuitting_cookie);
setTimeout(getTuittingCookie, 2000);
}

It should write the value every 2 seconds on the field:

<input id="tuittingID" style="display:none" value=""/>

But instead it does not write anything at all!

Can you help me please?

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1  
Side question: Why not use <input id="tuittingID" type="hidden" value=""/> instead of adding style="display:none"? Or as Ray Toal asked, are you intending to use a hidden div? –  Alex R. Aug 10 '11 at 8:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Are you calling function getTuittingCookie() in your code . this code works for me see example at http://jsfiddle.net/Z9dcb/2/

function getTuittingCookie() {
var tuitting_cookie= Math.floor(Math.random()*11)
$("#tuittingID").val(tuitting_cookie);
//alert(tuitting_cookie);
setTimeout(getTuittingCookie, 2000);
}
getTuittingCookie();

and in place of using code

you could use

<input id="tuittingID" type="hidden" value=""/>
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You probably want to write to a div, not an input, or else your input needs a type attribute and should not be display:none.

(Also, possibly stating the obvious, make sure the function is called and the cookie actually has content.)

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Assuming you are calling this function to begin with, everything looks fine.

$.cookie() will return null if a cookie is not found and assigning a null to the input's value using .val(null); is acceptable.

As for calling the function, you may want to do this on document.ready as in:

$(document).ready(function() {
    getTuittingCookie();
});

You may also want to consider using a hidden input <input type="hidden" /> as it hides itself automatically without having to fuss with display:none.

Also, this is debatable, but it might be safer to call setTimeout() using a string expression rather than the function name itself to avoid null references.

setTimeout('getTuittingCookie()', 2000);
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