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EDIT: I've added the C# equivilents to appeal to a wider audience - hope that's ok

VS2008 - .Net 3.5 (I therefore don't get convariance/contravariance support, as far as I know?)

It seems this is likely to require convariance/contravariance and therefore .Net 4, so to prevent the question being impossible, feel free to answer for .Net4 though, I would prefer a simple refactoring if it's available.

This should be simple but for some reason my brain just isn't up to the (any?) challenge this morning.

I have 2 applications (A & B). Details of application A hopefully aren'y important, so the following is WRT AppB which has 3 projects, all class libraries:

  1. Exposes my Domain Entities to the rest of AppB, and is also exposed to AppA
  2. Exposes my Data Model to AppB only (uses L2S, normal context and entities)
  3. Exposes functionality to AppA, using the Domain Entities for parameters/return types

I have the following interfaces in the 3 different projects:

In Project 1 (Domain Entities)

VB:

Public Interface IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of TKey)
     ReadOnly Property UniqueReference As TKey
End Interface

C#

public interface IAppB_Project1_Contract<TKey>
{
    TKey UniqueReference { get; }
}

In Project 2 (Data Model)

VB:

Public Interface IAppB_Project2_Contract(Of TKey)
     Inherits IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of TKey)
End Interface

C#:

public interface IAppB_Project2_Contract<TKey> : IAppB_Project1_Contract<TKey>
{
}

In Project 3 (Functionality)

VB:

Public Interface IAppB_Project3_Contract
     Function Create(Of T As {Class, IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of TKey)}, TKey)(ByVal entity As T) As TKey
End Interface

C#:

public interface IAppB_Project3_Contract
{
    TKey Create<T, TKey>(T entity) where T : class, IAppB_Project1_Contract<TKey>;
}

The idea was that the functionality contracts (in Project 3) would only use Domain Entities (in Project 1) as arguments/returns, because only Projects 1 and 3 are exposed to Application A, Project 2 is not.

My L2S entities are extended to implement the Project 2 Interface. There are actually several additional methods on Project 2's contract but hopefully not relevant.

Until I actually typed it, for some reason I had it in my head that I would get away with the following implementation of Project 3's contract:

VB:

Public Class Project3_Implementation
    Implements IAppB_Project3_Contract

    Public Function Create(Of T As {Class, IApp_Project2_Contract(Of TKey)}, TKey)(ByVal entity As T) As TKey Implements IAppB_Project3_Contract.Create
        ' notice the very subtle change to *Project TWO's* contract in the generics' constraint
    End Function
End Class

C#:

public class Project3_Implementation : IAppB_Project3_Contract
{
    public TKey Create<T, TKey>(T entity) where T : class, IApp_Project2_Contract<TKey>
    {
        // notice the very subtle change to *Project TWO's* contract in the generics' constraint
    }
}

This worked in my head for a while because Project 2's contract inherits Project 1's, but this of course is not the case because I have narrowed the constraint which therefore cannot implement the corresponding project 3 interface.

The question is, how would I go about achieving what I sought:

  • Project 2 should remain invisible to Application A, Project 1 and 3 however are exposed and should describe the functionality available and the entities to which Application A can/must use in order to call Application B
  • The Implementation of Project 3's contract, ideally, constrains the parameters to actually being the entities declared in the hidden project 2.

I've got a feeling I'm asking the impossible, but I'm hoping someone outside the box looking in can suggest something I can change to achieve, or come close to achieving my goals?

Thanks in advance!!

EDIT:

I knew the question wouldn't be clear because what I've described in the question is simply how to do something wrong...

Here's more details on the implementation of Project 3's contract which hopefully makes things more clear (bearing in mind that Project 2's contract is only implemented by auto-generated Linq Entities):

VB:

Public Class MyImplementation
    Inherits System.Data.Linq.DataContext
    Implements IAppB_Project3_Contract

    Public Function Create(Of T As {Class, IApp_Project2_Contract(Of TKey)}, TKey)(ByVal entity As T) As TKey Implements IAppB_Project3_Contract.Create
        Me.GetTable(Of T).InsertOnSubmit(entity)
        Return entity.UniqueReference        ' the entity will implement the IApp_Project2_Contract by exposings it primary key - Return Me.MyPrimaryKeyField
    End Function
End Class

C#:

public class MyImplementation : System.Data.Linq.DataContext, IAppB_Project3_Contract
{
    public TKey Create<T, TKey>(T entity) where T : class, IApp_Project2_Contract<TKey>
    {
        this.GetTable<T>.InsertOnSubmit(entity);
        return entity.UniqueReference;
        // the entity will implement the IApp_Project2_Contract by exposings it primary key - Return Me.MyPrimaryKeyField
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to add restrictions per project? I simply don't get why you need to define keys like that? The keys is just your solution, I want to know the original problem that you are trying to solve. Can't answer properly if I do not understand the actual problem. –  jgauffin Aug 10 '11 at 9:32
    
I know the question is a bit of a mess, please feel free to suggest ways to clean it up and make it somehow more clear. Cheers! –  Smudge202 Aug 10 '11 at 9:32
    
@jguaffin - not sure which part you're referring to? The restrictions by project? I don't want application A to directly contact the database via Project 2's context, the data is extremely sensitive and needs to pass through Project 3 for heavy validation, transformation, etc. Regarding Keys, I can't overload classes - sometimes the table/entity key is an Integer, sometimes a Short, sometimes a Long, sometimes a GUID, etc... So I've used the generics and contracts. I'll add a quick snippet to show what I'm trying to do inside the Project 3 Implementation... –  Smudge202 Aug 10 '11 at 9:35
    
Isn't this a covariance/contravariance question? –  Jodrell Aug 10 '11 at 9:39
    
Don't expose the databases or the database objects. Add a public domain layer which does all the validations. Restrict the database so that only the correct project may access it (using it's own credentials) –  jgauffin Aug 10 '11 at 9:40

1 Answer 1

What happens if you declare you interfaces like this, this would require .Net 4.0+

Public Interface IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of Out TKey)
    ReadOnly Property UniqueReference As TKey 
End Interface

Public Interface IAppB_Project2_Contract(Of Out TKey)
    Inherits IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of TKey)
End Interface

Public Interface IAppB_Project3_Contract
    Function Create(Of T As {Class, IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of TKey)}, 
                    TKey)(ByVal entity As T) As TKey       
End Interface

Would this make the inheritors of the interfaces covariant with the parent types and enable the code to run?

share|improve this answer
    
For the Create function: Error - Keywords 'Out' and 'In' can only be used in interface and delegate declarations. –  Smudge202 Aug 10 '11 at 10:09
    
@Smudge202, I've amended accordingly. Be interested to know if the idea works. –  Jodrell Aug 10 '11 at 10:50
    
thanks for your help thus far! Unfortunately the compiler has the same issue as I faced at the start: 'Public Function Create(Of T As {Class, IAppB_Project2_Contract(Of TKey)}, TKey)(entity As T) As TKey' cannot implement 'IAppB_Project3_Contract.Function Create(Of T As {Class, IAppB_Project1_Contract(Of TKey)}, TKey)(entity As T) As TKey' because they differ by type parameter constraints. It would of course all work w/o any contravariance if my implementation of contract3 just used contract1 as the generic constraint, but they're must be a way of constraining to contract2?? =( –  Smudge202 Aug 10 '11 at 11:06
    
+1 for the help - managed to answer this myself ignoring convariance completely, will post later. –  Smudge202 Aug 10 '11 at 13:26

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